Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSadhana, Ravishankaren_US
dc.contributor.authorReyna-Granados, Javier Rolando
dc.creatorReyna-Granados, Javier Rolandoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T22:48:18Z
dc.date.available2012-06-11T22:48:18Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228511
dc.description.abstractFoodborne pathogens are a threat to public health worldwide. Because many consumers prefer natural compounds to synthetic additives, research on safe plant-derived compounds with antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens is vital. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of plant essential oils (oregano, cinnamon, lemongrass), their active components (carvacrol, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral) and plant-extracts such as green tea, apple skin extract, black and decaffeinated black tea, grapes seed and pomace extracts against foodborne bacteria. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104, and serotype Newport, were selected conducting an antibiotic screening on 23 Salmonella isolates using seven antibiotics to determine antibiotic resistance. Listeria monocytogenes (strain 101M; beef and pork sausage isolate; resistant to antimicrobials in past investigations) was included to represent gram-positive bacteria. Escherichia coli O157:H7 virulent isolates (932- apple juice isolate; ATCC 35150- human isolate; F4637- sprouts isolate; used as a cocktail) were selected after conducting a Multiplex PCR over nine E. coli O157:H7 isolates to detect shiga-toxin 1 and 2 genes. All antimicrobials were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffered saline. In general, all pathogens were more susceptible to essential oils and their active components, than powder extracts. The most active antimicrobials from each category were directly applied on foods. The activity of oregano oil (0.5%) and green tea (3%) was evaluated against S. Typhimurium on chicken and S. Newport on tomatoes and sprouts, and the results showed that oregano oil was more effective. In addition, baby spinach leaf samples inoculated with green fluorescent protein labeled S. Newport were examined under confocal scanning laser microscope before and after antimicrobial treatments. Antimicrobial experiments against L. monocytogenes on sprouts, ham and bologna, carvacrol at 0.5% and grape seed extract at 3% were used and carvacrol showed better activity. Antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7 was tested on romaine lettuce, spinach and ground beef using oregano oil at 0.5% and green tea at 3%. Both compounds were effective showing no recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce and spinach; however, was not reduced in ground beef. Antimicrobial plant compounds have the potential for reducing foodborne pathogenic bacteria on/in various foods.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectfoodborne pathogensen_US
dc.subjectnatural antimicrobialsen_US
dc.subjectplant-extract compoundsen_US
dc.subjectPathobiologyen_US
dc.subjectantimicrobial activityen_US
dc.subjectessential oilsen_US
dc.titleControl of Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria Using Natural Plant Antimicrobialsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSadhana, Ravishankaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLynn, Joens A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReggiardo, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBright, Kelly R.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 19-Apr-2013en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePathobiologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2013-04-19T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractFoodborne pathogens are a threat to public health worldwide. Because many consumers prefer natural compounds to synthetic additives, research on safe plant-derived compounds with antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens is vital. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of plant essential oils (oregano, cinnamon, lemongrass), their active components (carvacrol, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral) and plant-extracts such as green tea, apple skin extract, black and decaffeinated black tea, grapes seed and pomace extracts against foodborne bacteria. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104, and serotype Newport, were selected conducting an antibiotic screening on 23 Salmonella isolates using seven antibiotics to determine antibiotic resistance. Listeria monocytogenes (strain 101M; beef and pork sausage isolate; resistant to antimicrobials in past investigations) was included to represent gram-positive bacteria. Escherichia coli O157:H7 virulent isolates (932- apple juice isolate; ATCC 35150- human isolate; F4637- sprouts isolate; used as a cocktail) were selected after conducting a Multiplex PCR over nine E. coli O157:H7 isolates to detect shiga-toxin 1 and 2 genes. All antimicrobials were evaluated in vitro in phosphate buffered saline. In general, all pathogens were more susceptible to essential oils and their active components, than powder extracts. The most active antimicrobials from each category were directly applied on foods. The activity of oregano oil (0.5%) and green tea (3%) was evaluated against S. Typhimurium on chicken and S. Newport on tomatoes and sprouts, and the results showed that oregano oil was more effective. In addition, baby spinach leaf samples inoculated with green fluorescent protein labeled S. Newport were examined under confocal scanning laser microscope before and after antimicrobial treatments. Antimicrobial experiments against L. monocytogenes on sprouts, ham and bologna, carvacrol at 0.5% and grape seed extract at 3% were used and carvacrol showed better activity. Antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7 was tested on romaine lettuce, spinach and ground beef using oregano oil at 0.5% and green tea at 3%. Both compounds were effective showing no recovery of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce and spinach; however, was not reduced in ground beef. Antimicrobial plant compounds have the potential for reducing foodborne pathogenic bacteria on/in various foods.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_12147_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
13.76Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record