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dc.contributor.advisorOrr, Barron J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWisneski, Kristin Dominique
dc.creatorWisneski, Kristin Dominiqueen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-12T18:44:59Z
dc.date.available2012-06-12T18:44:59Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/228612
dc.description.abstractIn an increasingly complex world, there is a need for youth to address scientific issues both locally and globally. While interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) decline, diverse methods to successfully engage, educate, and empower youth based on informal, learner-centric approaches are being tested. The factors potentially contributing to the success of a technology-supported civic engagement program were documented for 20 after school programs using qualitative methods. Using content analysis, the data was coded and tabulated and key variables were constructed. Univariate regression analysis revealed that four out of seventeen potential predictor variables proved to have a significant relationship with program success. The final multivariate regression model for predicting program success included youth-drivenness and total events (R-squared =0.58, p-value=0.0006), suggesting that encouraging participant ownership of the learning process is important to community and environmental problem awareness and the pursuit of solutions through STEM skills.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectinformal learningen_US
dc.subjectSTEM educationen_US
dc.subjecttechnologyen_US
dc.subjectyouthen_US
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen_US
dc.subjectcivic engagementen_US
dc.subjectcommunity asset mappingen_US
dc.titleReconnecting Youth with Community and Environment: Keys to Civic Engagement Education Program Successen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuyle, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcClaran, Mitchen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Mimien_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T07:04:35Z
html.description.abstractIn an increasingly complex world, there is a need for youth to address scientific issues both locally and globally. While interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) decline, diverse methods to successfully engage, educate, and empower youth based on informal, learner-centric approaches are being tested. The factors potentially contributing to the success of a technology-supported civic engagement program were documented for 20 after school programs using qualitative methods. Using content analysis, the data was coded and tabulated and key variables were constructed. Univariate regression analysis revealed that four out of seventeen potential predictor variables proved to have a significant relationship with program success. The final multivariate regression model for predicting program success included youth-drivenness and total events (R-squared =0.58, p-value=0.0006), suggesting that encouraging participant ownership of the learning process is important to community and environmental problem awareness and the pursuit of solutions through STEM skills.


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