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dc.contributor.authorArenson, John Dean
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-29T00:29:41Z
dc.date.available2012-06-29T00:29:41Z
dc.date.issued1975
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/231433
dc.description.abstractThe depths to buried bodies, characterized by anomalous gravity and magnetic properties, are determined by a combination of two numerical techniques. An upward continuation integral is solved by a method by Paul and Nagy using elemental squares and low order polynomials to describe the behavior of the gravity or magnetic data between observed data points. Downward continuation of the magnetic or gravity data is done by a finite difference technique as described by Bullard and Cooper. The applicability of the techniques are determined by comparison to depths determined by other means over the same anomalies and by comparison to various rule-of-thumb methods prevalent in the geophysical literature. The relative speed and cost of the particular computer system used is also considered in the applicability. The results show that although the initial costs of the computer program are high, the combined technique is as good as and at times better than the rule-of-thumb methods in determining the depth to the anomaly-causing body and is useful when more than just an approximate depth is of interest.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.subjectairborneen_US
dc.subjectanomaliesen_US
dc.subjectBougueren_US
dc.subjectdata processingen_US
dc.subjectdepthen_US
dc.subjectdeterminationen_US
dc.subjectfinite differencesen_US
dc.subjectgeophysical methodsen_US
dc.subjectgeophysical surveysen_US
dc.subjectgravity methodsen_US
dc.subjectinterpretationen_US
dc.subjectmagnetic methodsen_US
dc.subjectmathematical methodsen_US
dc.subjectmethodsen_US
dc.subjectprogramsen_US
dc.subjectresidualen_US
dc.subjectsurveysen_US
dc.subjectGravity prospecting -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic prospecting -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.titleDownward Continuation of Bouguer Gravity Anomalies and Residual Aeromagnetic Anomalies by Means of Finite Differencesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairSturgul, J. R.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc30352231
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSumner, J. S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorton, D. D.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.noteAntevs Libraryen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Geosciences Theses collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email the Antevs Library, antevs@geo.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.creatorArenson, John Deanen_US
dc.identifier.georef1975-023046
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T09:23:47Z
html.description.abstractThe depths to buried bodies, characterized by anomalous gravity and magnetic properties, are determined by a combination of two numerical techniques. An upward continuation integral is solved by a method by Paul and Nagy using elemental squares and low order polynomials to describe the behavior of the gravity or magnetic data between observed data points. Downward continuation of the magnetic or gravity data is done by a finite difference technique as described by Bullard and Cooper. The applicability of the techniques are determined by comparison to depths determined by other means over the same anomalies and by comparison to various rule-of-thumb methods prevalent in the geophysical literature. The relative speed and cost of the particular computer system used is also considered in the applicability. The results show that although the initial costs of the computer program are high, the combined technique is as good as and at times better than the rule-of-thumb methods in determining the depth to the anomaly-causing body and is useful when more than just an approximate depth is of interest.


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