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dc.contributor.authorAnand, Sarah
dc.creatorAnand, Sarahen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T21:52:39Z
dc.date.available2012-09-12T21:52:39Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationAnand, Sarah. (2012). China: The Rise of a Dragon The Future of teh Country in the International Order (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/243732
dc.description.abstractChina's rise as a political and economic entity has not gone unnoticed since the end of the Cold War. Over the past few decades, the United States has assumed dominancy in both of these realms, but the changing nature of global politics in the 21st century makes it imperative to question whether or not it will remain this way. By using a theoretical framework to describe the structure of global politics today, we are able to understand that empirical evidence negates the conjecture that China's rise will have a discernible impact on global politics, not only because it is not capable of altering it in a significant way, but also because it does not desire to do so.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleChina: The Rise of a Dragon The Future of teh Country in the International Orderen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T09:36:59Z
html.description.abstractChina's rise as a political and economic entity has not gone unnoticed since the end of the Cold War. Over the past few decades, the United States has assumed dominancy in both of these realms, but the changing nature of global politics in the 21st century makes it imperative to question whether or not it will remain this way. By using a theoretical framework to describe the structure of global politics today, we are able to understand that empirical evidence negates the conjecture that China's rise will have a discernible impact on global politics, not only because it is not capable of altering it in a significant way, but also because it does not desire to do so.


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