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dc.contributor.authorBrittain, Jessica Marion
dc.creatorBrittain, Jessica Marionen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-13T18:32:55Z
dc.date.available2012-09-13T18:32:55Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationBrittain, Jessica Marion. (2012). The Number and Density of Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) Neurons Across a Range of Brain Volumes (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/243896
dc.description.abstractBrains can differ in size for many reasons: the head that houses them is a certain size, restricting the volume inside; it would be impractical to have a large brain when your body is too small to carry around its weight; the volume taken up by the cell bodies differs. This last example is the focus of this research. Specifically, I looked at the clustering or density of cell bodies in the bumblebee brain (Bombus impatiens) inside the calyx of the mushroom body, where cells are typically small, and around the antennal lobe, where cells tend to be bigger. The density as well as the area range of these cell bodies were found using a grid counting system. I also found the total brain volume of each specimen (N=6), so I could compare the number of cell bodies counted to the brain volume. The results show that cell bodies are more densely packed in smaller volume brains and total cell body number increased with whole brain volume. There are many possible reasons for this trend and more research is needed to offer a solid answer.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleThe Number and Density of Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) Neurons Across a Range of Brain Volumesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-25T01:00:41Z
html.description.abstractBrains can differ in size for many reasons: the head that houses them is a certain size, restricting the volume inside; it would be impractical to have a large brain when your body is too small to carry around its weight; the volume taken up by the cell bodies differs. This last example is the focus of this research. Specifically, I looked at the clustering or density of cell bodies in the bumblebee brain (Bombus impatiens) inside the calyx of the mushroom body, where cells are typically small, and around the antennal lobe, where cells tend to be bigger. The density as well as the area range of these cell bodies were found using a grid counting system. I also found the total brain volume of each specimen (N=6), so I could compare the number of cell bodies counted to the brain volume. The results show that cell bodies are more densely packed in smaller volume brains and total cell body number increased with whole brain volume. There are many possible reasons for this trend and more research is needed to offer a solid answer.


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