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dc.contributor.authorBallard, Stanton Neal
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-15T01:51:14Z
dc.date.available2012-09-15T01:51:14Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244074
dc.description.abstractIn the San Dimas district, on the western flank of the Sierra Madre Occidental, near the small town of Tayoltita, Durango, gold and silver epithermal ore deposits are mined from the complex Arana fault system. The structural relationships of the Tayoltita system are well-mapped, but their kinematic relationship to ore deposition is unclear. In plan view and in cross-section, the Arana system has a horsetail or wedge-shaped geometry. Subsurface mapping of slickenside striae as movement indicators suggest that the N13°W-striking Arana fault, forming the eastern boundary of the system, is a normal slip fault with at least 250 m of throw. Subsidiary system faults display normal separation with varying degrees of dextral horizontal separation (which is a function of fault orientation). Experimental modeling of the Arana system indicated that the system formed under simple shear as the σ₂ and σ₃ stress axes rotated in a subhorizontal plane about σ₁. Rotational strain caused the developing fault strands to rotate and to be captured by the Arana fault, forming the typical wedge-shaped geometry. Later, a more complex rotation of the three major stress axes enabled hydrothermal fluids to progressively mineralize faults, which had more northerly strikes, by a process similar to progressive strain. This is documented by mineral assemblages that record the instants of fault opening and by the lack of mineralization along the high-angle, northwest- striking faults.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.subjectcontrolsen_US
dc.subjectDurango Mexicoen_US
dc.subjecteconomic geologyen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectmineral deposits genesisen_US
dc.subjectmineral resourcesen_US
dc.subjectSan Luis Minesen_US
dc.subjectstructural controlsen_US
dc.subjectTayoltitaen_US
dc.subjectwest-central Mexicoen_US
dc.subjectMines and mineral resources -- Mexico -- Tayoltitaen_US
dc.subjectOre deposits -- Mexico -- Tayoltitaen_US
dc.subjectGeology, Structuralen_US
dc.subjectmaps
dc.titleStructural Geologic Controls at the San Luis Mines, Tayoltita, Durango, Mexicoen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typemaps
dc.contributor.chairDavis, George H.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc6594052
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConey, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuilbert, John M.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.noteAntevs Libraryen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Geosciences Theses collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email the Antevs Library, antevs@geo.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.creatorBallard, Stanton Nealen_US
dc.identifier.georef1989-064708
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-19T09:34:34Z
html.description.abstractIn the San Dimas district, on the western flank of the Sierra Madre Occidental, near the small town of Tayoltita, Durango, gold and silver epithermal ore deposits are mined from the complex Arana fault system. The structural relationships of the Tayoltita system are well-mapped, but their kinematic relationship to ore deposition is unclear. In plan view and in cross-section, the Arana system has a horsetail or wedge-shaped geometry. Subsurface mapping of slickenside striae as movement indicators suggest that the N13°W-striking Arana fault, forming the eastern boundary of the system, is a normal slip fault with at least 250 m of throw. Subsidiary system faults display normal separation with varying degrees of dextral horizontal separation (which is a function of fault orientation). Experimental modeling of the Arana system indicated that the system formed under simple shear as the σ₂ and σ₃ stress axes rotated in a subhorizontal plane about σ₁. Rotational strain caused the developing fault strands to rotate and to be captured by the Arana fault, forming the typical wedge-shaped geometry. Later, a more complex rotation of the three major stress axes enabled hydrothermal fluids to progressively mineralize faults, which had more northerly strikes, by a process similar to progressive strain. This is documented by mineral assemblages that record the instants of fault opening and by the lack of mineralization along the high-angle, northwest- striking faults.


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Master's Thesis Full PDF
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Figure 14 - Santa Rita Sheet
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Figure 15 - East West Section
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Figure 16 - East West Section
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Figure 17 - North South Structure
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Explanation Map and Structure ...

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