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dc.contributor.advisorDamon, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBikerman, Michael, 1934-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-15T02:07:22Z
dc.date.available2012-09-15T02:07:22Z
dc.date.issued1962
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244087
dc.description.abstractThe main rock unit exposed in the southern part of the Tucson Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, is the Cat Mountain rhyolite. It forms the eastward dipping slope and the western escarpment of the mountain range, capping the large fault blocks which make up the range. Petrographic and radiometric data combine to show that the Cat Mountain rhyolite, as originally defined, consists of two major ash flow eruption sequences. The lower sequence is less uniform and continuous than the highly welded characteristically jointed upper unit. A basal non welded unit is found along the western escarpment, a partly welded transition zone is found between the welded units, and a capping partly-to-non-welded unit is exposed in protected parts of the eastern slope. The volcanic history of the area began with the emplacement of a nuee ardente deposit forming the “chaos” unit. This was followed by two ash flow pulses through the same vents, and the sequence was terminated by the intrusion of spherulitic rhyolite sealing up the vents.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectCat Mountain Rhyoliteen_US
dc.subjectgeochemistryen_US
dc.subjectigneous rocksen_US
dc.subjectrhyolitesen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectvolcanic rocksen_US
dc.subjectRhyolite -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectGeology -- Arizona -- Pima Countyen_US
dc.titleA Geologic-Geochemical Study of the Cat Mountain Rhyoliteen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc28230183
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.noteAntevs Libraryen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Geosciences Theses collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Antevs Library, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email the Antevs Library, antevs@geo.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.creatorBikerman, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.georef1989-058065
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T20:10:48Z
html.description.abstractThe main rock unit exposed in the southern part of the Tucson Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, is the Cat Mountain rhyolite. It forms the eastward dipping slope and the western escarpment of the mountain range, capping the large fault blocks which make up the range. Petrographic and radiometric data combine to show that the Cat Mountain rhyolite, as originally defined, consists of two major ash flow eruption sequences. The lower sequence is less uniform and continuous than the highly welded characteristically jointed upper unit. A basal non welded unit is found along the western escarpment, a partly welded transition zone is found between the welded units, and a capping partly-to-non-welded unit is exposed in protected parts of the eastern slope. The volcanic history of the area began with the emplacement of a nuee ardente deposit forming the “chaos” unit. This was followed by two ash flow pulses through the same vents, and the sequence was terminated by the intrusion of spherulitic rhyolite sealing up the vents.


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