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dc.contributor.authorMogk, Nathan William
dc.creatorMogk, Nathan Williamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T22:37:05Z
dc.date.available2012-09-17T22:37:05Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244493
dc.description.abstractThis thesis describes the design and construction of a wireless sensor network that harvests power for operations from a rectifying antenna. This project represents a proof-of-concept for future systems that will someday operate without the need of batteries or other conventional methods of storing power. This project was completed as a senior design project in the Engineering program at The University of Arizona for Drs. Marcellin and Xin. This project developed the described system from concept to an operational test in the laboratory that demonstrated the system working as expected while being powered by wireless energy transmission. Node input voltage reached a steady state near 0.8 V, and remained so for the entirety of the test. This project was pursued as a group effort.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleMicrowave-Powered Wireless Sensor Networken_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T20:18:49Z
html.description.abstractThis thesis describes the design and construction of a wireless sensor network that harvests power for operations from a rectifying antenna. This project represents a proof-of-concept for future systems that will someday operate without the need of batteries or other conventional methods of storing power. This project was completed as a senior design project in the Engineering program at The University of Arizona for Drs. Marcellin and Xin. This project developed the described system from concept to an operational test in the laboratory that demonstrated the system working as expected while being powered by wireless energy transmission. Node input voltage reached a steady state near 0.8 V, and remained so for the entirety of the test. This project was pursued as a group effort.


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