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dc.contributor.authorShay, Shaina*
dc.creatorShay, Shainaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T20:20:15Z
dc.date.available2012-09-18T20:20:15Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244781
dc.description.abstractThis paper evaluates the capacity for knowledge transmission and the range of influence of Muslim brotherhoods in Senegal. It then evaluates the potential to use the power structures of Muslim brotherhoods and the non-formal education they provide for communities, to influence and change local environmental discourses. The method proposed to create this change is a theoretical narrative founded on the ecological ethics present in both the Quran and the documented sayings and practice of the prophet Muhammad (the sunnah). The method I propose to introduce this narrative is to integrate the ecological ethic present in Islam into the curriculum provided in Quranic schools, daaras, by the religious teachers, marabouts. Marabouts play the dual role as religious figureheads and Islamic teachers who deliver religious education to youth (the majority young boys), called talibe. A large number of the students in the daaras of Dakar are composed of children sent by rural families to get some form of education. Through a theoretical analysis, a literature review, and an interview, it was determined that there is a possibility, although extremely slim, to use the non-formal religious education system created by Muslim brotherhoods to shape the ecological consciousness of future Senegalese society.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleMuslim Brotherhoods, Islam, and the Environment: Can Their Intersection Result in Changing Ecological Discourses in Senegal?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-28T02:01:13Z
html.description.abstractThis paper evaluates the capacity for knowledge transmission and the range of influence of Muslim brotherhoods in Senegal. It then evaluates the potential to use the power structures of Muslim brotherhoods and the non-formal education they provide for communities, to influence and change local environmental discourses. The method proposed to create this change is a theoretical narrative founded on the ecological ethics present in both the Quran and the documented sayings and practice of the prophet Muhammad (the sunnah). The method I propose to introduce this narrative is to integrate the ecological ethic present in Islam into the curriculum provided in Quranic schools, daaras, by the religious teachers, marabouts. Marabouts play the dual role as religious figureheads and Islamic teachers who deliver religious education to youth (the majority young boys), called talibe. A large number of the students in the daaras of Dakar are composed of children sent by rural families to get some form of education. Through a theoretical analysis, a literature review, and an interview, it was determined that there is a possibility, although extremely slim, to use the non-formal religious education system created by Muslim brotherhoods to shape the ecological consciousness of future Senegalese society.


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