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dc.contributor.authorShufeldt, Michael Anthony
dc.creatorShufeldt, Michael Anthonyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T20:24:04Z
dc.date.available2012-09-18T20:24:04Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244798
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, the medical tourism industry has sprung up around the world. Due to increasing costs of healthcare and health insurance in many Western countries, citizens of these countries are beginning to travel to developing nations to receive healthcare at affordable prices. This paper airs to build an overview of the medical tourism industry, specifically focusing on Americans traveling to Mexico. High quality private hospitals with JCI (Joint Commission International) accreditation and American trained doctors have already been built in towns relatively near the United States border, with the hope of attracting American patients. To the dismay of these hospitals, they are not seeing nearly the volume of foreign patients that they anticipated. Some potential reasons for this are lack of information on price transparency and cost saving potential as compared to the same procedures in the US, fear of low quality of care, and a mistrust of Mexico due to recent and increasing publicity of cartel and gang related violence. These issues are discussed in order to help a potential patient decide if medical tourism is the right option. The continued growth of this industry will likely have a large effect on the future of American and other Western healthcare, adding an element of competition that has not been there before.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleMedical Tourish: Is Traveling to a Mexican Hospital a Good Idea When It Comes to Surgery?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T20:20:54Z
html.description.abstractOver the past decade, the medical tourism industry has sprung up around the world. Due to increasing costs of healthcare and health insurance in many Western countries, citizens of these countries are beginning to travel to developing nations to receive healthcare at affordable prices. This paper airs to build an overview of the medical tourism industry, specifically focusing on Americans traveling to Mexico. High quality private hospitals with JCI (Joint Commission International) accreditation and American trained doctors have already been built in towns relatively near the United States border, with the hope of attracting American patients. To the dismay of these hospitals, they are not seeing nearly the volume of foreign patients that they anticipated. Some potential reasons for this are lack of information on price transparency and cost saving potential as compared to the same procedures in the US, fear of low quality of care, and a mistrust of Mexico due to recent and increasing publicity of cartel and gang related violence. These issues are discussed in order to help a potential patient decide if medical tourism is the right option. The continued growth of this industry will likely have a large effect on the future of American and other Western healthcare, adding an element of competition that has not been there before.


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