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dc.contributor.authorWerchan, Denise Marie
dc.creatorWerchan, Denise Marieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T21:59:09Z
dc.date.available2012-09-18T21:59:09Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/244818
dc.description.abstractRecent research suggests that dopamine facilitates the formation of long term memory and may allow for the adaptive use of memory. During reinforcement learning, dopamine is released in the ventral tegmental area of the brain (VTA), which facilitates long term potentiation (LTP). The VTA is also reactivated during sleep, although the function of this reactivation is currently unknown. Additionally, there is evidence that sleep also facilitates the generalization of memory; however an interaction between the dopaminergic system and sleep on the adaptive use of memory has not been directly investigated. Thus, in this study we investigated the combined effects of the interaction between sleep and reinforcement during learning on performance in a transitive inference task, which requires the integration and generalization of disparate premise memories. Our results showed that: 1) reinforcement during learning is required for successful generalization in transitive inference; 2) when reinforcement occurs during learning, sleep further enhances the ability to make transitive inferences, compared to an equal period of wake. These data provide evidence of an interaction between sleep and the dopamine reward system to facilitate generalization from existing memories.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Sleep and Reinforcement on the Formation of Transitive Inferences and Relational Memoryen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T20:55:15Z
html.description.abstractRecent research suggests that dopamine facilitates the formation of long term memory and may allow for the adaptive use of memory. During reinforcement learning, dopamine is released in the ventral tegmental area of the brain (VTA), which facilitates long term potentiation (LTP). The VTA is also reactivated during sleep, although the function of this reactivation is currently unknown. Additionally, there is evidence that sleep also facilitates the generalization of memory; however an interaction between the dopaminergic system and sleep on the adaptive use of memory has not been directly investigated. Thus, in this study we investigated the combined effects of the interaction between sleep and reinforcement during learning on performance in a transitive inference task, which requires the integration and generalization of disparate premise memories. Our results showed that: 1) reinforcement during learning is required for successful generalization in transitive inference; 2) when reinforcement occurs during learning, sleep further enhances the ability to make transitive inferences, compared to an equal period of wake. These data provide evidence of an interaction between sleep and the dopamine reward system to facilitate generalization from existing memories.


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