• A Landscape of Memories: A Master Plan design for the Crawford Town Hall

      Radcliffe-Meyers, Lori; Scott, Elizabeth; Livingston, Margaret; Walthier, Helen (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As we continue to lose valuable landscapes to the pressures of growth and development, we need to keep in mind the history that some of these landscapes hold. They help tell the stories of our past and hold a special place in the hearts and minds of many. Historic buildings are typically recognized for their value and history that they tell and are often restored, helping to preserve a part of a community’s past. Yet the landscapes that helped shape the community and give meaning to the place are often overlooked. Looking at these landscapes, and putting as high of a value on the landscape as the buildings that are set upon them, is important and continues to be a topic that has come to the forefront.
    • Las Palmas: An approach towards sustainable tourism development in Baja California Sur, Mexico

      Liggett, Aaron; Frederickson, Mark; Stoltz, Ronald; Scott, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As mass tourism is spreading throughout Latin America, haphazard growth is threatening the environment and local communities. In an effort to mitigate social and environmental impacts an alternative approach towards tourism development utilizes principles of ecotourism and smart growth to balance tourism, community, and environmental goals in order to maintain a healthy environment and contribute to the local community. Located several miles south of the town of Todos Santos in Baja California Sur, Mexico, Las Palmas is a 490 acre site with a mixed use development focused on ecological preservation and the integration of tourism with the local community. Entirely pedestrian oriented, the development includes a 46 unit ecolodge that is connected to a town center composed of a variety of housing types, and features commercial services, selected retail, and fitness and community centers. A 14 acre organic farm weaves through the development providing fresh vegetables to the local market and restaurants. 95% of the site is set aside as permanent natural open space run by research facilities that responsibly guide visitors through its natural beauties. Sustainable practices and research at Las Palmas include an onsite constructed wetland to treat and reuse wastewater, energy-efficient design strategies, a solar harvesting farm, an onsite agricultural center, and ecological regeneration.
    • Linking Children and Nature through Design: Integrating nature education for children of the Texas Panhandle into Palo Duro Canyon

      Booth, Amy; Johnson, Lauri MacMillan; Livingston, Margaret; Scott, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      It has been suggested that the natural world establishes one of the most significant contexts children encounter during their most critical years of development. When children are allowed to interact with nature, they are able to make essential connections between humans, animals, natural systems, and gain a better understanding of the world at large. Unfortunately, within the span of a few decades, more and more children are losing touch with the natural world; the way they comprehend and interact with the outdoors is radically changing. To battle the current indoor trends, outdoor learning environments are springing up all over the country. This project serves to further examine outdoor educational facilities and to tailor a modified outdoor nature center prototype into the base of Palo Duro Canyon State Park in the Texas Panhandle. A final master plan will examine ways to implement various educational strategies for children while respecting the existing canyon ecosystem and ingraining a sense of stewardship into the nature center’s young visitors.
    • Redesign of Eldora Mountain Resort: A Conceptual Plan to Enhance Boulder's Backyard

      Sullivan, Sara E.; Scott, Elizabeth; Stoltz, Ronald; Frederickson, Mark (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      When skiing was originally introduced, the sport was focused on the mountain and recreational experience. However, as the market has expanded and operations have improved, ski resorts have turned into large corporate businesses competing with each other and making it difficult for smaller resorts, such as Eldora Mountain Resort, to survive. Just as important, the essence of the sport has become diluted, as the natural mountain experience is becoming lost among the corporate industry. In addition to the large expansive resorts, there is intense land use and a number of environmental impacts such as clear cutting, loss of habitat, erosion, and high water use. Eldora Mountain Resort is a small ski resort outside of Nederland, CO generally used for day skiing. While major destination and day skiing resorts such as Vail, Aspen, and Breckenridge continue to dominate the Interstate 70 corridor, Eldora has a unique opportunity to accommodate skiers and mountain enthusiasts of northern Colorado, as there are no other ski resorts in its immediate surroundings. The resort currently lacks on-site lodging and has limited use during the warm months, with the exception of hiking. The purpose of this research is to address key issues of mountain tourism and the associated environmental impacts in a conceptual redesign of Eldora Mountain Resort. This project examines how Eldora Mountain Resort can integrate year-round recreational opportunities, while focusing on how the resort can strengthen its connection to the natural mountain setting and improve environmental practices, all while creating a unique experience for visitors.