• Accessibility for persons with mobility impairments in Sabino Canyon Recreation Area's Upper Canyon

      Havens, William H.; Steward, Shirley Kathleen, 1949- (The University of Arizona., 1992)
      This thesis discusses accessibility issues for persons with mobility restrictions visiting Sabino Canyon Recreation Area's Upper Canyon near Tucson, Arizona. A shuttle bus from the Visitor Center area provides the only motorized access into the Canyon interior. Designated shuttle stop areas are inaccessible, preventing some individuals with mobility problems from extending their time in the natural setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate physical inaccessibility at the shuttle stops and provide design recommendations to improve access appropriate to the natural setting, using proposed guidelines which are being considered by the USDA Forest Service, Sabino's managing agency, for its outdoor recreation areas. The methods used were an evaluation of each shuttle stop area and application of the proposed guidelines to assign accessibility accommodation levels to each shuttle stop. Recommended modifications within each level are given. Conceptual plans for two shuttle stop areas and detailed drawings for facility accessibility are provided. A review of literature on human preferences and psychological benefits associated with natural environments, the impacts of physical disabilities, and accessibility legislation and standards is included.
    • Applications of environment-behavior-design research to planned communities

      Zube, Ervin H.; McCormick, Bailie Grant, 1963- (The University of Arizona., 1990)
      This study addresses and evaluates the use of Environment-Behavior-Design (E-B-D) research in planned community practice in greater Pima County, using the specific plan approach. The research uses two methods; (1) a review of planning documents; and (2) interviews with planners. The results suggest that very little E-B-D research use has occurred in specific plans, although respondents were supportive of E-B-D research. Recommendations are made for improving research applications and for appropriate subjects for E-B-D research on planned communities.
    • Categories of elderly experience in the landscape

      Wilkin, Donovan C.; Doxtater, Rebecca Jo, 1944- (The University of Arizona., 1992)
      Aspects of landscape experience by the elderly are explored. An understanding of this user group is sought through investigation of stereotypes, personality traits, psyco-social, and physical aspects of aging. A construct of use categories provides a system for understanding the environment in terms of what it is perceived to provide its users. Use categories include wayfinding, human territoriality, cultural expression, visual and non-visual aesthetics, and task performance. Drawing from literature and research in many areas, each of these categories is first defined in general terms. Each is then surveyed relative to its more specific application to the elderly which is followed by an examination of each category as it relates to the elderly and landscape. Application of categories to site analysis, programming, design, post-occupancy evaluations, and research is proposed. Some landscape design implications for the elderly are noted along with areas for further research.
    • The development of travel guide specifications to increase the awareness of landscape architecture and natural resource management

      Havens, William H.; Davis, Sarah Lee, 1945- (The University of Arizona., 1994)
      The problem addressed is the public's lack of awareness of the contributions of landscape architects and other natural resource professionals to the practices of land stewardship. One solution is a travel guide to be developed using marketing and interpretive principles. The research question is: what should be the content of the travel guide such that it would increase public awareness about landscape architecture and related natural resource professions and their role in land stewardship? The scope included research for planning the guide: it excluded collection of specific project information. A questionnaire was administered to landscape architects at two professional meetings. The major findings include which topics best explain the profession, and the types of projects that should be selected. These findings are valuable to natural resource professional societies and to publishing industry marketers, and for use in pursuing grant funding to continue the guide's development.
    • An examination of Post-Modernism in landscape architecture

      Havens, William B.; Flickinger, Mark John, 1956- (The University of Arizona., 1991)
      This thesis explores the meaning of Modernism and Post-Modernism in landscape architecture and asks if contemporary landscape architecture can be classified as Post-Modern. Art, architecture, and landscape architecture were examined during the Industrial and Post-Industrial Eras to see if there is a correlation between each discipline's stylistic movements. Arguments both for and against the existence of a Post-Modern Movement in landscape architecture are presented. It is concluded that art and architecture are the current leaders in creating innovative, historically memorable landscape designs, and that there is need for further exploration, teaching, and debate about contemporary design history and theory.
    • Fear in the landscape: Characteristics of the designed environment as they relate to the perceived and actual safety of women from assault and rape

      Johnson, Lauri Macmillan; Huffman, Debra Kay, 1952- (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      Research has shown that women perceive, use, and experience space differently than men, in part, because of gender issues and fear of victimization for violent crimes. Recent research has focused on the built environment, violence against women, and the social context of a university. The research study described here investigated women's perception of and actual safety from assault and rape on The University of Arizona campus. Sites perceived as safe and unsafe were identified from responses of 100 women students and administrators. Police reports of 132 campus assaults of women were used to identify sites of past rapes and assaults. Two outdoor sites were assessed in a preliminary study of two environmental audit methods. Findings from this study indicated that respondents perceived the campus as being very safe during the day but unsafe at night. Sites of previous assaults on women overlapped little with the areas women associated with fear.
    • From Classic to Gothic: The interplay between the universals and the particulars in the European architectural history

      Matter, Fred S.; Nakhai, Farzad, 1947- (The University of Arizona., 1991)
      This thesis deals with the development of and the interaction between the ideals of classical universalism and the ideas of Gothic particularism. Part One traces the birth and the development of classical universalism; Part Two, medieval particularism. Part Three deals with the renaissance of the classical formulas, the adversary position the Renaissance held against medievalism and its consequences for the succeeding centuries. Part Four deals with the ideas of particularism making a come-back, leading to the formation of the Gothic Revival Movement. The Gothic Revival Movement and its adversary position against classical universalism is treated in Part Five. Part Six looks at the ninteenth century Revivalism and the birth of the new industrial era.
    • Site planning in Guadalajara architecture education: An exploratory study

      Gimblett, Howard R.; Vergara, Santiago (The University of Arizona., 2000)
      In recent years, the use of site planning in architecture has significantly increased. However, a large number of architecture schools in Mexico have not included this subject in their educational profile. This may strongly impact regions where there is an absence of city planning-related disciplines to cover this demand. This study explores how professionals, professors and students of architecture schools in Guadalajara, Mexico, perceive the importance of site planning in their profession and examines the potential of expanding these concepts in their curricula. This study found that site planning concepts and applications are considered essential knowledge for Guadalajara architects' education. Aso, a high potential for expanding site development issues, the use of systematic approaches, and the incorporation of tools was found.
    • Visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing: An evaluation of six exhibits in the western United States

      Livingston, Margaret; Ridgway, Stephanie Clark (The University of Arizona., 2000)
      The design of zoo and aquarium exhibits has a strong influence on visitor behavior in exhibit enclosures. Furthermore, zoo exhibits with underwater viewing draw large crowds. The intent of this study was to formulate significant design criteria, through post-occupancy evaluation, to be used for the design of successful underwater exhibits in zoos. This study was conducted to reveal factors significantly influencing viewing time and visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing. At four zoo facilities, 331 visitor groups were observed and asked to participate in a short survey at six zoo exhibits. Chi-square analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate observation and survey results. The size of the underwater viewing window, animal size, animal aquatic activity, presence of infant animals, visitor group type and crowding levels had a significant impact on visitor behavior. Recommendations for the future design of underwater zoo exhibits are discussed.