• The University Village: Planning Framework and Open Space Development

      Copp, Bryan David; Havens, William H.; Johnson, Lauri M.; Medlin, R. Larry (The University of Arizona., 1993)
    • URBAN LAND USES IN NOGALES, SONORA, MEXICO

      LOPEZ QUINTERO, LUIS JAIME (The University of Arizona., 1998)
    • Urban Voids: A Potential in Tucson's Wasted Spaces

      Palomo, Isaac (The University of Arizona., 2020)
      In the last decade, urban voids have emerged as a challenge for rapidly urbanizing cities. Especially in the city center where the early city settlement was situated, many urban and industrial functions have moved out leaving behind abandoned and under-utilized spaces. Underutilized and abandoned land in urban areas are often overlooked and neglected, ultimately rendering them as unattractive, dead spaces. Urbanization has led urban life to become dull due to the degrading of the environment and the devoid of space for sociocultural activities. As city populations continue growing, there is an increased pressure to provide open outdoor spaces for inhabitants. Urban Voids are a vital component in the context of social interaction and act as a meeting point to enable people to have direct contact with the society around them. The aim of this study is to understand the urban character of dead spaces within Tucson’s downtown district and identify a wasted space that has the potential to be leveraged into an active space to further enhance and strengthen the public realm.
    • Visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing: An evaluation of six exhibits in the western United States

      Livingston, Margaret; Ridgway, Stephanie Clark (The University of Arizona., 2000)
      The design of zoo and aquarium exhibits has a strong influence on visitor behavior in exhibit enclosures. Furthermore, zoo exhibits with underwater viewing draw large crowds. The intent of this study was to formulate significant design criteria, through post-occupancy evaluation, to be used for the design of successful underwater exhibits in zoos. This study was conducted to reveal factors significantly influencing viewing time and visitor behavior in zoo exhibits with underwater viewing. At four zoo facilities, 331 visitor groups were observed and asked to participate in a short survey at six zoo exhibits. Chi-square analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to evaluate observation and survey results. The size of the underwater viewing window, animal size, animal aquatic activity, presence of infant animals, visitor group type and crowding levels had a significant impact on visitor behavior. Recommendations for the future design of underwater zoo exhibits are discussed.
    • A Walk on the Wild Side: Incorporating Ecological Design and Ethnobotany Interpretation in Morris K. Udall Park

      Hatch, Dionna (The University of Arizona., 2020)
      Parks have the potential to be educational, athletic, aesthetic, and artistic places. This work focuses on the linking of art, ecology, ethnobotany and socialization within a portion of a recreational park. The project utilizes the framework of Sonoran ecology and ethnobotany, while integrating the elements of Citizen Science programs and social environments within a new trail. The framework will be applied to a public recreational park, Morris K. Udall Regional Park, to develop a unique socially dynamic, educational and artistic space that inspires users about the natural environment. Methods include: literature review, site analysis, and design guidelines. Final outcomes will include an on-line resource for Citizen Science programs, master plan design for Udall Park, revegetation techniques, and a social ethnobotanical center for the east side of Tucson. Recommendations for the integration of Citizen Science programs and educational art installations are included throughout the design.
    • Water in Tucson: Policy, Planning, and Public Involvement

      Hathaway, Pamela Lynne.; Ingram, Helen M.; Brickler, Stanley K.; Wilkin, Donovan C.; Gregg, R. Frank (The University of Arizona., 1984)
      This paper describes and assesses the policies, planning agencies, and citizen advisory committees which are involved in water resource decision making in the Tucson basin. Shifting priorities in basin water uses are traced by reviewing four events and trends. This review, together with a description of existing policies and planning agencies, provides the basis for assessing the status and potential for public involvement in water resource decision making. The influence of the citizens advisory committees on water resource decision making depends on the relationship among an agency, a committee, and the general public. If citizens advisory committees are to address controversial issues, such as those surrounding the priorities of water use in the basin, a link between community education and political participation is necessary.
    • Wetlands and Bouncy Castles: A Juarez Nature Park Along the Us-Mexico Border

      Nuno-Whelan, Mario (The University of Arizona., 2020)
      What the heck do wetlands and bouncy castles have to do with each other? Usually, absolutely nothing. This project proposes that maybe they could. The focus here is the design of a constructed wetland park in the city of Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, that uses treated effluent to create wildlife habitat that once existed in the floodplain of a meandering Rio Bravo/Rio Grande prior to channelization. However, there are two broader design challenges that make it unique: 1) the site is adjacent the Juarez-El Paso border and directly across the river from an existing 372-acre Rio Bosque Wetlands Park in El Paso, constructed in the 90s and irrigated by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant; and 2) the site is an undeveloped patch of agricultural land nearly surrounded by compact, single-family housing in an overlooked community. And this is where bouncy castles fit in. The goal is to integrate undeveloped wetland habitat with much-needed recreation space for a dense, urban neighborhood in a growing Mexican city. If you’ve ever been to a big public park in a Southwest city around graduation season or summer birthdays, you’ll know that shade ramadas and bbq grills get a lot of love. Families - and I mean families: grandmas, grandkids, aunts, neighbors, friends, every age group - go all out with food and lawn games...and sometimes, for big occasions...bouncy castles. Public parks are used similarly in Juárez. Families often visit parks in big groups. In order for this park to work, that kind of visitation needs to be designed for. The bouncy castle is a symbol. No, the park doesn’t come with bouncy castles and they will probably seldom be there. But they could be. And the design allows for it. It even welcomes it. It allows for people to use the park the way a lot of people actually use parks: in big groups, with food and family and games, with coolers and tables and camping chairs. The bouncy castle is a poofy pink stand-in for future graduation parties, family reunions, and Sunday family picnics in a park that also has wetlands and trails and unprogrammed nature.