• IRON HORSE PARK RENOVATION: Preserving Iron Horse Park & Arroyo Chico as a critical social open space in an urban context

      Livingston, Margaret; Sanabria, David J. (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Cities are full of underutilized or neglected spaces with the potential to be re-purposed into a land use that can provide more valuable open space to urban dwellers. This action is sometimes referred to as “Infrastructure for All” Places such as brown-fields, parking lots, alleys, isolated underpasses and city washes are just some of them. Like many cities in United States, the city of Tucson is becoming more and more dense with a tendency to grow vertically, meaning that the common ground is shared; streets, sidewalks, plazas, parks, to name a few. Public spaces such as parks, give people the opportunity to interact every day, “the more they interact with each other, the more they accept each other. Encouraging people of different generations, race, and income levels to interact and share is a positive experience. Through this experience they learn that they can peacefully coexist with people who are different from themselves”. The purpose of this master's report will be to promote social interaction through the enhancement and reactivation of a city park, that has been neglected or forgotten and that may be threatened by new development and densification. “Densification is happening in Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Boston— in most cities, actually. Even sprawled-out cities like Austin, Texas, are densifying, with tall residential towers in downtown” To preserve an existing urban park by encouraging human interaction brings many benefits to the city in terms of revitalization of places, encouraging people to walk through and connect with their community, and it can also help to build the local economy.
    • INTERLACE: NANHU ECOLOGICAL PARK - New development of the city, ecological restoration, and reuse of abandoned man-made reservoirs

      Song, Zhiuyan (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      As urbanization has progressed in Lijin County that is located in Shandong, China, natural areas have gradually been replaced by concrete banks and decorative greenery plantings. The original wild wetland landscape’s degradation has influenced people living in this county who have lost their sense of belonging. Currently, there is an excellent opportunity to redevelop the Lijin’s new district: Southern District. The 75-hectare Lijin Reservoir built in 2002 will be considered for re-use and participation in an urban ecological restoration. A plan will redesign the deserted reservoir into a residential-friendly, ecological, new urban open space showing the unique wetland landscape of the Yellow River estuary and Lijin’s urban culture. At the same time, it will serve as an essential part of the entire urban water system, promoting public water circulation and improving water quality. Overall, this will promote the surrounding economic development and cultural construction.
    • Mission Revival: Reimagining The San Xavier Mission Del Bac’s Relationship With the Land and its Community

      Livingston, Margaret; Bonnet, Cody (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Located in the Sonoran Desert ten miles southwest of Tucson, Arizona is Mission San Xavier Del Bac, a Franciscan mission and pilgrimage site that hosts hundreds of thousands of visitors annually. Founded by Spanish missionary Father Eusebio Kino in the late 17th century, the Mission has a storied history of intercultural trade and working relationships between the Native Tohono O’odham people and Spanish settlers. In the O’odham language, the mission is called “where the water runs in” in reference to the nearby Santa Cruz River. Historically, it ran year-round and was the catalyst for agricultural development in the area, but due to repeated human intervention is now primarily a dry bed. Today, the mission is an active parish that has achieved National Historic Landmark status and National Register designation. All of these factors culminate in a historic preservation project with intricate contextual layers that must be balanced and sensitively considered, which leads to critical questions throughout the process: What was the landscape like before and after various stages of human impact? Are there historic features that can be restored and preserved? If so, should they be? Ultimately, this project seeks to answer these questions through the lens of responsive site design both at the Mission and the surrounding Reservation landscape. The story of this land is a significant one, and this project seeks to accomplish how best to share it.
    • El Rio Preserve riparian rehabilitation & community recreation

      Stoicof, Alexandra (The University of Arizona., 2017)
      The Sonoran Desert is a unique biodiverse landscape of approximately 100,000 square miles in Southwestern United States. It is characterized by seasonal monsoon rains in both the summer and winter that sustain some 2,000 different plant species, making it a comparatively lush desert. Because of the Sonoran Desert’s geographic location and seasonal precipitation patterns, a variety of biomes can be found in the region, including tundra, coniferous forest, temperate deciduous forest, grassland, chaparral, desert, thornscrub, and tropical forest (Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, 2017). Within these biomes are corridors of riparian communities, which are areas of watercourses that create unique habitats. In the Southwest, many of these riparian watercourses are currently ephemeral and only fl ow temporarily throughout the year. These xeroriparian habitats (dry riparian) are largely and increasingly ephemeral because of human disturbances. Watercourses that once were perennial, such as the Santa Cruz River, now flow primarily only during the monsoon rains. Riparian communities are critical components in the network of biomes and habitats in the Sonoran Desert. They provide corridors for the movements of plants and animals, and sustain unique species in the desert that require more water. These communities are also beautiful, lush landscapes that are often enjoyed by humans for their oasis-like qualities; trails, camping and picnicking spots, and scenic points-of-view are often found along watercourses. The El Rio Preserve in Marana, Arizona is such a riparian community tucked along the banks of the Santa Cruz River. It is part of a chain of other regionally-significant habitats, and presents opportunities for both habitat and human recreation. Many species of plants and animals have found refuge at El Rio, including invasive species. Its origins as a former borrow pit, however, make it a disturbed xeroriparian landscape that could benefit from rehabilitation strategies. The following Master’s Report presents a process and design for El Rio. A majority of the work was done in collaboration with the Town of Marana. Public participation was a large component of the project, which informed many design decisions. A comprehensive literature and case review, and ongoing site assessments also contributed to the final design and rehabilitation strategies.
    • MULTI[FUNCTIONAL] an approach to maximize use of remnant urban space

      Hatch, Andrew (The University of Arizona., 2016)
      The urbanization boom this country experienced in the twentieth century set the foundation for the urban fabric we live in today. The urban fabric functions as a result of the many and varied systems modern society has built in hopes of taming the forces of nature. An important example of one of these networks, though seldom seen and rarely celebrated, is the urban drainage system. Creeks and wetlands covered significant portions of coastal southern California until urbanization arrived in the early twentieth century. Typically small in scale but rich in biodiversity, these creeks came roaring to life following winter rains, draining the basin to the sea, all while feeding the wetlands that protected the coastal land. However, in an attempt to eliminate flooding risk and provide stable land on which to build, the majority of the coastal creeks were entombed in concrete, some above ground, and others below. What sounded like a good idea at the time has become a relic of the past. The experiment has demonstrated what happens when an ecological resource is misinterpreted as a liability in the urban fabric. That is, with research and observation, it is now becoming clear that these resources are assets to the communities and regions in their vicinities. Additionally, these potential resources have been walled off and shut away from the public, creating corridors that act as barriers within the urban fabric. A new attitude has emerged toward urban drainage infrastructure as the potential ecological and social benefits of green infrastructure become clearer in the public’s mind. Research along with many successful infrastructure projects from around the globe demonstrate the potential multiple benefits green infrastructure strategies can provide. These projects offer examples of strategies and elements that combine to create successful multi-functional spaces centered on urban infrastructure. A desire to synthesize these new strategies and traditional landscape architectural methods informed the development of a master plan for remnant urban space straddling a channelized coastal waterway in Oxnard, CA. This project demonstrates one approach to re-imagining coastal infrastructure as a multifunctional asset that provides habitat and recreational and social opportunities for the local community.
    • DEPOT PARK Reviving a Layered Landscape

      Marenfeld, Jonathan (The University of Arizona., 2016)
      As Tucson grows and its downtown is revitalized open spaces are quickly disappearing. The lack of open space downtown is partially due to the temporary closure of Viente de Agosto Park, the pending closure Jácome Plaza near the Main Library, and numerous development opportunities. Cities of all sizes seem to have a park that hosts events big and small and gives its residents a taste of nature in an urban environment. Many studies have shown that urban parks provide city residents social and psychological benefits while also having ecological and environmental services (Chiesura, p. 129). The goal of this project is to create an urban park for downtown Tucson that is capable of hosting events, festivals, or just lunch with a friend. The park will serve as a major stop along various established and planned routes. It will also be designed in a way that conserves water while using solar and wind technologies to reduce the need for already strained and increasingly expensive resources. To aid in the concepts and design GIS data, case reviews, and local regulations and ordinances will be explored.
    • Bridging the Gap with Tucson's Urban Fissure

      Rapp, Ethan Yuri (The University of Arizona., 2016)
      As cities continue to develop, they can experience changes and subsequent decline in particular industries and land uses. In some cases, structures are abandoned and vacant lots remain as remnants of past uses. In central Tucson, Arizona, there is a fragment of land that separates two important districts. The proposed site, Tucson’s Urban Fissure, can be viewed as a landscape that is underutilized, barren, scorched, and is in need of a new identity. To the north of the Urban Fissure, sits an avenue of shops and restaurants that are well established, and to the south a newly built, thriving, living, urban hub. This fissure provides an opportunity to help fuse these districts. This area has the potential to link two thriving urban nodes: Fourth Avenue and Downtown Tucson. Currently this, Urban Fissure has a set of historic train tracks running along its side. This cultural inspiration along with Iron Horse Park can be looked at as a set of catalysts that can help spur a new sense of identity for this site. Through the creation of an urban park on Tucson’s Urban Fissure, the author will provide the city of Tucson with a valuable addition to its urban fabric. Through special attention to spatial scale, circulation, shelter and refuge areas, and spatio- temporal landscape patterns, the design will realize a new image for the cavity that currently sits in between central Tucson Arizona’s most heavily used districts (4th Avenue and Downtown), while also activating the underutilized land. This work is intended to illustrate to the city how the sense of movement can bridge the gap in needed linkages within the urban fabric of Tucson.
    • Second City: An Urban Revitalization Plan for Colón, Panamá

      Hyson, Kendra (The University of Arizona., 2015)
      As the world shifts towards increased urbanization, issues of social inequity also begin to rise to the forefront, often affecting most critically those citizens who are economically disadvantaged. Areas in which there are fewer resources to defend against the negative impacts of rapid urban development tend to become a detriment to those citizens living in said areas. Such is the case with Panamá, a nation suffering from economic inequality post-rapid urbanization, much to the detriment of its citizens. Even with substantial economic growth over the last decade, Panamá still boast the second most unequal distribution of income in Latin America (Archibold 2013). The “high-value” service industries that dominate the Panamanian economy total an approximate 75-80% of the country’s annual $30 billion economy – an indication of a possibly thriving job market (Lilly and Associates, 2012). This places Panamá in a unique position to begin the mitigation of economic inequality. Colón, traditionally known as Panamá’s “Second City”, is home to the largest free trade zone in the Western Hemisphere, the Colón Free Zone (CFZ), and has been greatly impacted by this uneven distribution of wealth (U.S. Department of State 2015). Even with much emphasis on improving the CFZ, via talks of a new international airport and port expansion, little attention has been given to the city’s residents (Lilly and Associates 2012). Colón’s ideal Caribbean coastal location, beautiful tropical landscapes and historic architecture make it a prime location for trade, tourism and urban development, leaving no evident reason for the desertion currently being experienced by its citizens and landscape. The number of challenges facing Colón coupled with the city’s historic, cultural and economic significance have created a complex blend of contextual factors begging for exploration. Moreover, many of the problems in Colón deserve considerable analysis as it is in desperate need of revitalization. These challenges, problems and ongoing concerns, however, are far beyond the scope and depth of the time allotted for this master’s report. Nevertheless, this project intends to highlight some of the key components prohibiting Colón’s development, transforming those constraints into opportunities for growth. The focus of this master’s report is to investigate and conceptualize potential solutions to the issues plaguing Colón. Primarily, this report will examine what contributions landscape architectural strategies can provide to the city of Colón in helping increase quality of life for its citizens. Through cultural resilience strategies, green infrastructure, increased connectivity and sustainable tourism practices, the culminating design attempts to demonstrate how Colón can be restored to its former status as a bustling metropolis of tourism and trade.
    • Creating a Multi-modal Transit Corridor: Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

      Alammar, Mashal Hamed (The University of Arizona., 2015)
      The aim of this research is to address the lack of transportation and connectivity in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The industrial field is the biggest investment for Saudi Arabia, and the number of commuting industrial employees has become an enormous burden on the infrastructure system. Jubail Industrial city is located in an expanding and dynamic area and contains experts, companies and colleges focusing on the industrial sector, but it is suffering from the tremendous number of mobility issues for commuters. More than 45,000 employees and students commute daily to Jubail City from Dammam, Qatif, and Ras-Al Khair, and they face many problems on their way such as traffic, accidents, and pollution. Thus, this project will address these issues, and provide a regional plan containing a multi-modal transportation corridor connected with urban hubs between Jubail and Dammam.
    • THE TACOMA FLATS A study of post-industrial urban waterfront rejuvenation

      Herman, Brandon (The University of Arizona., 2014)
      Named after nearby Mount Rainier, Tacoma has been on a slow but steady rebound from the economic decline of a postindustrial nation. Founded at the terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1873, Tacoma’s economy was historically based largely on the exportation of natural resources, such as timber and coal. Although still trying to find its stride, this Pacific Northwest city has retained, for the most part, the blue collar industrial grit that the city was originally founded on. Like most industrial cities, Tacoma suffered a prolonged decline in the mid-20th century. An effect of suburbanization and disinvestment, the city still finds many of its historic structures and vacant parcels largely underutilized. However, since the 1990’s, the city has felt some effects of reinvestment. The University of Washington integrated a Tacoma campus into the Downtown core, Tacoma Link, the state’s first light rail line, and the Thea Foss Waterway urban waterfront redevelopment all helped to provide the local economy with a much needed boost. Additional investments in the downtown include the restoration of Union Station and the creation of the Museum District, which includes The Museum of Glass, Bridge of Glass, Tacoma Art Museum, Washington State History Museum, Lemay-America’s Car Museum, Children’s Museum of Tacoma, and Foss Waterway Seaport - a centuryold shipping warehouse and maritime heritage educational center. Tacoma also posses a thriving theatre district. Perhaps we have disinvestment to thank for the lack of redevelopment that has ultimately lead to the preservation of vast blocks of historic Tacoma. This fact, along with a more affordable housing market, and greater investment interest help lay the foundation for a future as a complete and healthy metropolitan center. This city inherently holds many of the desirable amenities, spatial arrangements, and historical vernacular that other cities around the country are trying to recreate post urban renewal era. The Tacoma Flats programming and design makes many assumptions regarding the future of this city - a fully realized economy, a large regional population expansion, and increased efficiencies in port functions. This 2050 vision is just that, a glimpse of how underutilized former industrial areas adjacent to the downtown core could be used to accommodate the growth, health, and ecological function of this historically rich region of the Puget Sound. The Tacoma Flats 2050 vision is simply the realization of possibilities.
    • PRESIDIO DEL TUBAC MASTER PLAN

      Lehman, Brianna (The University of Arizona., 2014)
      Tubac Presidio State Historic Park has the unique distinction of being the first state park in Arizona. It also firmly sits within the varied cultural history of southern Arizona, along the De Anza trail and is a part of the mission system in the Santa Cruz River Valley. The Presidio San Ignacio de Tubac was established in 1752, and was the first European settlement in what later became the state of Arizona. It is one of only three presidios in the state of Arizona, and is the only one that can be easily visited. There are a number of structures within the park that are placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The park itself has suffered under budget cuts from the State of Arizona, and recently faced being shut down. An intrepid group of volunteers stepped forward and manages the day-to-day activities of the park, while fundraising for improvements and other capital costs. Because of the budget cuts, and ensuing issues, the park suffers from a lack of attention, and poor visitor experience. This project will propose a master plan for development within the park that will focus on the visitor’s experience, as well as phasing strategies for eventual implementation of the plan. This plan will specifically focus on large-scale issues, such as site circulation, grading and drainage, and interpretive landscape design. Appropriate and interpretive design will help communicate the significance of this area in the history of Arizona, as well as the development of the Southwest. This site also provides an opportunity to display native and appropriate landscape design for this region, and educating other visitors in the uniqueness of the natural habitat of the upper Sonoran Desert. This project will also illustrate signage and other interpretive elements to address the challenge of clearly communicating the importance of a historic site that is not necessarily highly visible in the site alone.
    • Dog Park Design: A Successful Southwest Dog Park

      Melnick, James Harrison; Livingston, Margaret; Stoltz, Ron; Blazquez, Oscar (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Dog parks are becoming increasingly popular in urban areas where little space is available for interactions with dogs off-leash. Dog parks should help the well-being of the owners and ensure a sense of security for themselves and their canines. However, a poorly designed dog park or dog-friendly park can be difficult to deal with and can even increase the risk of incident among dogs. This research asks how can a dog park, or dog friendly park increase the interactions between owners and maintain a positive design aesthetic while providing a functional outdoor space.
    • Sustainable Landscape Development of Urban Waterfront: A waterfront park design along Sanjiao Lake, Xinmin River and Taizi Lake in Wuhan Economic Development Zone in China

      Lu, Li; Frederickson, Mark; Livingston, Margaret; Blazquez, Oscar A. (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As an important natural resource, urban watercourses have a close relationship with urban development, such as significant connectivity, ecological values and recreational opportunities. Unfortunately, conservation and development of urban waterfronts have not received sufficient attention in many cities in China. Rapid urban development in China has led to decrease in urban watercourses, degradation of urban riparian areas and water pollution. This work focuses on strategies for developing waterfront areas along Sanjiao Lake, Xinmin River and Taizi Lake which is located in Wuhan Economic Development Zone, China.
    • Envisioning Oakland: The Ballpark District

      Blazquez, Oscar; Quach, Kevin; Livingston, Margaret; Stoltz, Ronald (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      The Oakland Athletics Baseball team has been lobbying for years to move to San Jose, a wealthier city than the current one they are in. The current ballpark of the Athletics, Oakland Coliseum, opened in September 18, 1966 and has housed the Athletics ever since 1968. With many teams in Major League Baseball relocating to newer sports facilities, the Athletics would like to do the same. One possible site for the Athletics’ new sports facility is in Downtown Oakland. With the city in a state of recovery, the Athletics could potentially play a hand in the revitalization of the downtown, stimulating new growth within the city. This project intends to use the ballpark to potentially aid and accelerate growth in Downtown Oakland while strengthening Oakland’s economy. This is done by gathering research information of selected literature and review the information to inform the design. Case studies of successful ballparks and their designs follow the literature review to support the design decisions. The design process includes a site inventory and analysis, conceptual diagrams, and a master plan. The results: A newly established ballpark district that includes a Market Street redevelopment, reworked public transportation, and the expansion of the San Francisco Bay Trail among other developments.
    • Natural Heart: Yangchun Lake Suburban Center Master Plan

      Wang, Yuxin (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Urbanization in China is rapidly improving with the economic growth. But the development that ignores environment has caused lots of environmental problems in Chinese cities, especially the large ones. As the capital of Hubei Province, Wuhan is the fifth among China cities for its size and its economic production. Because of extreme urbanization and high dense population in Wuhan city, some significant issues have been constantly emerged: lack of adequate wastewater management and water resources protection, urgent need for efficient solution to sludge treatment and disposal, serious urban flooding because of the natural flow or urban lakes and streams restriction, degradation of water quality, and so on. These issues have been seriously impacted the quality life in the city. Along with the urbanization, the conflicts between urban development and ecosystem are inescapable. How can urban development balance environmental sensitivity to support ecological health in the vulnerable urban ecosystem and mitigate the problems in the city? This project tries to redesign a master plan for Yangchun Lake sub-urban center in Wuhan city and find suitable ways to mitigate these problems with attention to the environmental, functional, economic, social and aesthetics aspects of the proposed solutions. The design will balance the urban development and environmental protection, support and enhance the development of a new ecological urban center.
    • Las Palmas: An approach towards sustainable tourism development in Baja California Sur, Mexico

      Liggett, Aaron; Frederickson, Mark; Stoltz, Ronald; Scott, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As mass tourism is spreading throughout Latin America, haphazard growth is threatening the environment and local communities. In an effort to mitigate social and environmental impacts an alternative approach towards tourism development utilizes principles of ecotourism and smart growth to balance tourism, community, and environmental goals in order to maintain a healthy environment and contribute to the local community. Located several miles south of the town of Todos Santos in Baja California Sur, Mexico, Las Palmas is a 490 acre site with a mixed use development focused on ecological preservation and the integration of tourism with the local community. Entirely pedestrian oriented, the development includes a 46 unit ecolodge that is connected to a town center composed of a variety of housing types, and features commercial services, selected retail, and fitness and community centers. A 14 acre organic farm weaves through the development providing fresh vegetables to the local market and restaurants. 95% of the site is set aside as permanent natural open space run by research facilities that responsibly guide visitors through its natural beauties. Sustainable practices and research at Las Palmas include an onsite constructed wetland to treat and reuse wastewater, energy-efficient design strategies, a solar harvesting farm, an onsite agricultural center, and ecological regeneration.
    • Maximizing Minimal Green Space: Re-thinking land use on Coast Guard Bases

      Rasmussen, Libby; Stoltz, Ron (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Green space and how it is utilized on Coast Guard bases varies widely due to a lack in regulations on green space development. Creating a design and development model for green space that can be applied to all bases and yet still be customizable, will help set guidelines on this type of land use that can ultimately increase the morale and well-being of the Coast Guard members. The model will be based on small scale design that incorporates nodes of activity, creating spaces that encourage physical fitness and recreation that address Coast Guard fitness requirements, support military functions, and increase the opportunities for outdoor social gathering spaces. Inherent to the node designs will be the use of ecologically minded design that will encourage habitat creation and storm water filtrations in conjunction with the use native plants. These micro-scale designs will focus on conservative installation and maintenance costs and require smaller spaces to implement than typical larger scale solutions, yet could pay off exponentially in increased physical and positive social activity in these spaces. Once the model is created, it will be applied to the Coast Guard Base Seattle located on Pier 36, downtown Seattle, WA.
    • A New Life Behind Bars - A Prison Retrofit From Prison to Community Resource

      Machado, Micaela; Scott, Beth; Scott, Beth; Stoltz, Ron; North, Deb (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Sustainability practices in design development are a common goal in urban settings, especially in an environment such as the arid Southwest U.S. where resources are limited. Here, sunshine and heat are abundant where water resources are low. So, how can we use these circumstances and constraints to our advantage in future designs or in potential retrofits? Institutional establishments with long-term residents, such as prisons, which use a significant amount of resources can reduce their energy, food and water costs by using sustainable practices. These practices can help reduce the costs of prisoner housing and eventually lower costs to tax payers. This project focuses on a hypothetical retrofit of the Wilmot Department of Corrections (Wilmot D.O.C.) prison facility in Tucson, AZ.
    • Pilgrim Hot Springs: A Master Plan: Bringing together geothermal energy, history and Iñupiaq culture to create a sustainable and economically viable eco-tourism destination to the Seward Peninsula, Alaska

      Hallbert, Desneige Marie; Stoltz, Ron; Livingston, Margaret; Babb, Zachary (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Pilgrim Hot Springs is a historic landscape in northwestern Alaska on the Seward Peninsula. It is located 60 miles north of Nome, the end location of the famous Iditarod dogsled race. Once a Catholic orphanage, today it is a hot springs soaking destination for those who know of its existence and who are able to access it. Recently, under the ownership of Unaataq, LLC, a consortium of seven Native corporations and regional nonprofits, plans to renovate the site are just beginning. This master’s report assists Unaataq, LLC, in the design of a Master Plan to reinvigorate Pilgrim Hot Springs using ecological, historical, and cultural sensitivity to drive the design. This Master Plan uses the concept of integrating recreation, conservation, and education to create a viable economic ecotourism base camp from which other tourism opportunities based on the Seward Peninsula can be accessed. Pilgrim Hot Springs will provide creative options for year round human comforts and recreation, will sustainably harvest geothermal energy to operate off the grid, and create agricultural opportunities for the resort and the local native communities for year round consumption and economic gain. Methods for investigation include: case reviews of existing similar projects, site visit and landscape analysis, and informal interviews.