Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSanfey, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichols, Shaunen_US
dc.contributor.authorKvaran, Trevor Hannesson*
dc.creatorKvaran, Trevor Hannessonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-05T21:28:10Z
dc.date.available2012-10-05T21:28:10Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/247271
dc.description.abstractAlthough the non-profit sector is now the third largest sector of the global economy, relatively little is known about the psychological processes that underlie decisions to donate to charity. Across five experiments, the present research explores two factors that are thought to underlie giving: social norms and personal values. Study 1 elicits personal values and manipulates descriptive social norm information and finds that both of these factors influence giving behavior. Study 2 replicates these findings with injunctive norms in place of descriptive norms. Study 3 manipulates both descriptive and injunctive social norms within a single study and finds that while both have an influence on giving, they do not interact in any meaningful way with each other. Study 4 manipulates descriptive and injunctive norm information in the context of a realistic online donation decision and finds that both injunctive norms influence rates of giving, but that descriptive norm information alone influences willingness to give. Study 5 experimentally manipulates the costs and benefits associated with viewing social information and finds that while participants are willing to view social information when there are no associated costs, willingness to view information decreases dramatically under even very small costs. We conclude in Chapter 6 by discussing the implications of these findings and potential directions for future research.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSocial Normsen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCharitable Givingen_US
dc.subjectPersonal Valuesen_US
dc.titleThe Influence of Social Norms and Personal Values on Charitable Giving Behavioren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanfey, Alanen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-11T13:34:25Z
html.description.abstractAlthough the non-profit sector is now the third largest sector of the global economy, relatively little is known about the psychological processes that underlie decisions to donate to charity. Across five experiments, the present research explores two factors that are thought to underlie giving: social norms and personal values. Study 1 elicits personal values and manipulates descriptive social norm information and finds that both of these factors influence giving behavior. Study 2 replicates these findings with injunctive norms in place of descriptive norms. Study 3 manipulates both descriptive and injunctive social norms within a single study and finds that while both have an influence on giving, they do not interact in any meaningful way with each other. Study 4 manipulates descriptive and injunctive norm information in the context of a realistic online donation decision and finds that both injunctive norms influence rates of giving, but that descriptive norm information alone influences willingness to give. Study 5 experimentally manipulates the costs and benefits associated with viewing social information and finds that while participants are willing to view social information when there are no associated costs, willingness to view information decreases dramatically under even very small costs. We conclude in Chapter 6 by discussing the implications of these findings and potential directions for future research.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_etd_12303_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
824.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record