ABOUT THE COLLECTION

This collection contains master's reports from the Landscape Architecture program, dating back to 1990. Most of these reports and theses were digitized from paper copies held previously in the Fine Arts Library, while reports and theses after 2005 were submitted electronically to be archived and made available online.


QUESTIONS?

Contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with questions about items in these collections.

Recent Submissions

  • Mission Revival: Reimagining The San Xavier Mission Del Bac’s Relationship With the Land and its Community

    Livingston, Margaret; Bonnet, Cody (The University of Arizona., 2019)
    Located in the Sonoran Desert ten miles southwest of Tucson, Arizona is Mission San Xavier Del Bac, a Franciscan mission and pilgrimage site that hosts hundreds of thousands of visitors annually. Founded by Spanish missionary Father Eusebio Kino in the late 17th century, the Mission has a storied history of intercultural trade and working relationships between the Native Tohono O’odham people and Spanish settlers. In the O’odham language, the mission is called “where the water runs in” in reference to the nearby Santa Cruz River. Historically, it ran year-round and was the catalyst for agricultural development in the area, but due to repeated human intervention is now primarily a dry bed. Today, the mission is an active parish that has achieved National Historic Landmark status and National Register designation. All of these factors culminate in a historic preservation project with intricate contextual layers that must be balanced and sensitively considered, which leads to critical questions throughout the process: What was the landscape like before and after various stages of human impact? Are there historic features that can be restored and preserved? If so, should they be? Ultimately, this project seeks to answer these questions through the lens of responsive site design both at the Mission and the surrounding Reservation landscape. The story of this land is a significant one, and this project seeks to accomplish how best to share it.
  • ABSOLUTE STREET, a new type of streetscape for future high-density urbanism

    Livingston, Margaret; An, Tai (The University of Arizona., 2019)
    During the past decades, conflicts between the natural ecosystems and the need for urban development has led to a loss of connection to green spaces in urban cores. The Park Avenue in New York represents a highly-developed central business district with limited connections to green space. Currently the pedestrian space in Park Avenue exists as only a 16-foot-wide sidewalk. With limited areas for green space, people generally move from one destination to another with a highly-straightforward purpose. The median in this area could represent a space associated with activities that would capture interest for those moving through the space. Urbanism often drives the downtown area into an antipedestrian place where structures and automobiles occupy 90% of the surface. People are active “in the cracks” of those components, where population and parking problems are often not addressed. This project focused on a modular design on Park Avenue to study different possibilities that attempt to highlight how green space and inhabitants coexist with the development of the city. Additionally, it presents a solution to replace a simple function area with one that is more multi-functional.
  • The University Village: Planning Framework and Open Space Development

    Copp, Bryan David (The University of Arizona., 1993)
  • URBAN LAND USES IN NOGALES, SONORA, MEXICO

    LOPEZ QUINTERO, LUIS JAIME (The University of Arizona., 1998)
  • The Revitalization Of Benson, Arizona

    O'Sullivan, Rheana (The University of Arizona., 2003)
  • SACRAMENTO RIVER PARK MASTER PLAN

    CAMACHO-SERNA, MIGUEL (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • MEDIA LUNA SPRING MASTER PLAN SAN LUIS POTOSI, MEXICO

    TORRES SAUCEDA, EMANUEL (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • CREATING EXPERIENCES: THE CITY OF KNOWLEDGE INTERPRETIVE NETWORK

    SUSSMAN, RACHEL M. (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • CIUDAD DEL SABER / CITY OF KNOWLEDGE / MASTER PLAN

    SU, HYEWON (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • BUTTE CREEK TRAILS PROJECT: A MASTER PLAN

    CLIFFORD, SARS (The University of Arizona., 2002)
  • ANALYSIS OF THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPES OF FORT BOWIE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

    PINTO, ROBIN LOTHROP (The University of Arizona., 2000)
  • Revitalization of Alleys - creating safe, social and green networks in central Tucson

    Zhao, Kexin; Livingston, Margaret; Livingston, Margaret; Blazquez, Oscar; MacMillan-Johnson, Lauri (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    Alleys are underutilized corridors that can potentially provide many valuable uses in cities. Alleys can be used for multiple purposes during the day and night: conventional functions, dog walking, water harvesting, art display and as renewable energy showcases, to name a few. In addition, they can become welcoming and popular linear gathering spaces. On a grander scale, they can be used as networks and connections between destinations. This project proposes to evaluate the current challenges and opportunities of alleys in central Tucson, to create multiple design templates for safe, social, and green alleys, and to enhance the connectivity to Tucson Modern Streetcar Areas.
  • Natural Heart: Yangchun Lake Suburban Center Master Plan

    Wang, Yuxin (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    Urbanization in China is rapidly improving with the economic growth. But the development that ignores environment has caused lots of environmental problems in Chinese cities, especially the large ones. As the capital of Hubei Province, Wuhan is the fifth among China cities for its size and its economic production. Because of extreme urbanization and high dense population in Wuhan city, some significant issues have been constantly emerged: lack of adequate wastewater management and water resources protection, urgent need for efficient solution to sludge treatment and disposal, serious urban flooding because of the natural flow or urban lakes and streams restriction, degradation of water quality, and so on. These issues have been seriously impacted the quality life in the city. Along with the urbanization, the conflicts between urban development and ecosystem are inescapable. How can urban development balance environmental sensitivity to support ecological health in the vulnerable urban ecosystem and mitigate the problems in the city? This project tries to redesign a master plan for Yangchun Lake sub-urban center in Wuhan city and find suitable ways to mitigate these problems with attention to the environmental, functional, economic, social and aesthetics aspects of the proposed solutions. The design will balance the urban development and environmental protection, support and enhance the development of a new ecological urban center.
  • A New Life Behind Bars - A Prison Retrofit From Prison to Community Resource

    Machado, Micaela; Scott, Beth; Scott, Beth; Stoltz, Ron; North, Deb (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    Sustainability practices in design development are a common goal in urban settings, especially in an environment such as the arid Southwest U.S. where resources are limited. Here, sunshine and heat are abundant where water resources are low. So, how can we use these circumstances and constraints to our advantage in future designs or in potential retrofits? Institutional establishments with long-term residents, such as prisons, which use a significant amount of resources can reduce their energy, food and water costs by using sustainable practices. These practices can help reduce the costs of prisoner housing and eventually lower costs to tax payers. This project focuses on a hypothetical retrofit of the Wilmot Department of Corrections (Wilmot D.O.C.) prison facility in Tucson, AZ.
  • Integrating Biophilic Principles and Therapeutic Design Elements in Outdoor Spaces for Children at Tucson Medical Center

    Davidson, Deryn; Livingston, Margaret; Livingston, Margaret; Blazquez, Oscar; Stoltz, Ronald (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    As concern for the health and wellbeing of children grows in a society geared toward a more sedentary lifestyle, many doctors and therapists are pointing to the importance of access to, and time spent interacting with the natural world. The idea of using the restorative properties of nature in healing has been around since ancient times. There is currently a renaissance in the health care industry looking at the importance of incorporating gardens into the design of health care facilities once again. This project proposes to explore the importance for children in health care facilities to have access to the natural world while using the biophilia hypothesis as a framework for design. Furthermore, the benefits of outdoor areas for the families (particularly siblings) of child patients and the staff of the health care facilities was explored. Through the use of literature and case reviews, data was collected and synthesized to determine the elements best used to strengthen the designs for children’s therapeutic environments. Outcomes include three models of therapeutic environments including focus areas for the Tucson Medical Center campus in Tucson, Arizona.
  • Linking Children and Nature through Design: Integrating nature education for children of the Texas Panhandle into Palo Duro Canyon

    Booth, Amy; Johnson, Lauri MacMillan; Livingston, Margaret; Scott, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    It has been suggested that the natural world establishes one of the most significant contexts children encounter during their most critical years of development. When children are allowed to interact with nature, they are able to make essential connections between humans, animals, natural systems, and gain a better understanding of the world at large. Unfortunately, within the span of a few decades, more and more children are losing touch with the natural world; the way they comprehend and interact with the outdoors is radically changing. To battle the current indoor trends, outdoor learning environments are springing up all over the country. This project serves to further examine outdoor educational facilities and to tailor a modified outdoor nature center prototype into the base of Palo Duro Canyon State Park in the Texas Panhandle. A final master plan will examine ways to implement various educational strategies for children while respecting the existing canyon ecosystem and ingraining a sense of stewardship into the nature center’s young visitors.
  • Las Palmas: An approach towards sustainable tourism development in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Liggett, Aaron; Frederickson, Mark; Stoltz, Ronald; Scott, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    As mass tourism is spreading throughout Latin America, haphazard growth is threatening the environment and local communities. In an effort to mitigate social and environmental impacts an alternative approach towards tourism development utilizes principles of ecotourism and smart growth to balance tourism, community, and environmental goals in order to maintain a healthy environment and contribute to the local community. Located several miles south of the town of Todos Santos in Baja California Sur, Mexico, Las Palmas is a 490 acre site with a mixed use development focused on ecological preservation and the integration of tourism with the local community. Entirely pedestrian oriented, the development includes a 46 unit ecolodge that is connected to a town center composed of a variety of housing types, and features commercial services, selected retail, and fitness and community centers. A 14 acre organic farm weaves through the development providing fresh vegetables to the local market and restaurants. 95% of the site is set aside as permanent natural open space run by research facilities that responsibly guide visitors through its natural beauties. Sustainable practices and research at Las Palmas include an onsite constructed wetland to treat and reuse wastewater, energy-efficient design strategies, a solar harvesting farm, an onsite agricultural center, and ecological regeneration.
  • A Landscape of Memories: A Master Plan design for the Crawford Town Hall

    Radcliffe-Meyers, Lori; Scott, Elizabeth; Livingston, Margaret; Walthier, Helen (The University of Arizona., 2013)
    As we continue to lose valuable landscapes to the pressures of growth and development, we need to keep in mind the history that some of these landscapes hold. They help tell the stories of our past and hold a special place in the hearts and minds of many. Historic buildings are typically recognized for their value and history that they tell and are often restored, helping to preserve a part of a community’s past. Yet the landscapes that helped shape the community and give meaning to the place are often overlooked. Looking at these landscapes, and putting as high of a value on the landscape as the buildings that are set upon them, is important and continues to be a topic that has come to the forefront.

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