• ABSOLUTE STREET, a new type of streetscape for future high-density urbanism

      Livingston, Margaret; An, Tai (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      During the past decades, conflicts between the natural ecosystems and the need for urban development has led to a loss of connection to green spaces in urban cores. The Park Avenue in New York represents a highly-developed central business district with limited connections to green space. Currently the pedestrian space in Park Avenue exists as only a 16-foot-wide sidewalk. With limited areas for green space, people generally move from one destination to another with a highly-straightforward purpose. The median in this area could represent a space associated with activities that would capture interest for those moving through the space. Urbanism often drives the downtown area into an antipedestrian place where structures and automobiles occupy 90% of the surface. People are active “in the cracks” of those components, where population and parking problems are often not addressed. This project focused on a modular design on Park Avenue to study different possibilities that attempt to highlight how green space and inhabitants coexist with the development of the city. Additionally, it presents a solution to replace a simple function area with one that is more multi-functional.
    • ANALYSIS OF THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPES OF FORT BOWIE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

      PINTO, ROBIN LOTHROP (The University of Arizona., 2000)
    • Arroyo Chico Riparian Design: Integrating stormwater management with greenway enhancement

      Wang, Xi (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      The focus of this research is on re-design of degraded riparian systems in a desert climate and urban context. Specifically, it explores a landscape approach for rehabilitating the Tucson’s Arroyo Chico Wash. Analyses were performed to assess the site condition within its context to determine an appropriate treatment that addresses social and ecological functions. In particular, a greenway plan that implements water management infrastructure was designed on the site, creating social and ecological benefits for surrounding communities. Ultimately, it is the author’s intent to establish a framework and principles for similar riparian projects in urban environments.
    • Art for Plants’ Sake: Encouraging Arid Plant Palettes Through Installation Art

      Livingston, Margaret; Lutheran, Matthew (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      The City of Tucson is currently experiencing growing pains as urban revitalization converts empty lots throughout Downtown Tucson into housing and retail. The increase in density results in a city with more pedestrian amenities, however it also reduces the amount of available urban green space. As the space for green amenities contract, the remaining landscape is converted into a commercially available plant palette, however this development provides no reference to Tucson’s environmental context. Tucson is located within the Sonoran Desert, a semi-arid region that receives 12” of annual rainfall. Limited water availability combined with extreme heat has created a unique ecosystem of diverse plant and animal life adapted to difficult conditions. The urban environment creates additional environmental constraints such as degraded soils, increased disturbance, and reduced light, which lead many urban projects to select plant material solely based on urban constraints. As urban development brings more residents into the urban core, the demand for urban parks will continue to increase. Small urban parks are a valuable refuge for residents and wildlife alike, providing relief from the urban environment. Urban parks provide important social spaces allowing the community to gather and landscape elements that reflect the community to strengthen its identity. Public art enhances the urban environment by illustrating the genus loci that bonds residents to the site and their community while engaging new users. To reflect the unique context of the Sonoran Desert, Tucson’s urban parks must educate the public about the benefits of working in concert with Tucson’s natural environment. A series of art installations will highlight the unique methods plants of the Sonoran Desert use to survive harsh desert conditions. Installation art will promote understanding of arid-adapted plants while accompanying planting displays will acclimatize the public to the aesthetics of desert landscapes. As the public becomes aware of the benefits of climate-appropriate plants they will demand that these communities are integrated into the urban landscape matrix to benefit the city and environment alike. Desert-adapted plants provide native habitat, and give residents greater connection to their city and highlighting the unique context of Tucson’s surroundings.
    • ASTORIA URBAN WATERFRONT PARK: RE-IMAGINING EXISTING ABANDONED PLAYGROUNDS IN QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY

      Livingston, Margaret; Nguyen, Truc (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      The City of New York is the most populated city in the United States and thus also in the state of New York. With the population increasing every day, lands become very precious. Buildings keep growing upward to create more living and working spaces for New Yorker. With the gift of nature, water, and land, a waterfront park has become one of the attractions for New Yorkers and tourists during the daytime. However, the city has been facing an issue of sea level rise over many years. Many studies show that sea level is rising at an accelerated rate, especially along the U.S. east coast. Because of this reason, New York City officials have required designers to consider this issue in their future designs. This study documented the design process of a Master Plan for the Astoria Urban Waterfront Park in Astoria neighborhood, Queens, New York City. The project outcomes minimized the effectiveness of sea level rise while providing an inhabitable space for the residents. Astoria Urban Waterfront Park is an opportunity to restore biodiversity, create habitat for wildlife, grant access to the water, and house outdoor activities. A review of relevant literature was conducted to develop a framework for the design approach. Case reviews of other urban and waterfront parks were conducted for project outcomes and programs. In-depth site analysis and inventory were captured the site conditions and contextual surrounding. Outcomes focus on two public open spaces connected by a waterfront corridor.
    • BIODIVERSITY & INCLUSION: Leveraging community connections into shared stewardship and increased conservation capacity at Tumamoc Hill and beyond

      Livingston, Margaret; Casebeer, Nichole (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      The question is not if, but ever increasingly, how and where do urban areas and conservation intersect, and further how urban regions will shape the future of the planet’s biodiversity. As reported by the IUCN, in many parts of the world they [Urban Protected Areas] are the only places not completely dominated by human influence, and the only hope for the survival of many of the world’s plant and animal species, including humans themselves. The primary goal of protected areas is conservation, and protecting the region’s natural and cultural diversity, however traditional conservation is often focused on controlling human disturbance through restrictive measures - extremely limiting and/or eliminating human access and influence to sensitive areas. Increasingly, it is being recognized that urban areas require unique conservation approaches which acknowledge the extent to which human and natural systems are interconnected, for better and for worse. Rather than focusing on the worst and eliminating these connections, more contemporary approaches focus on embracing and celebrating this contact, and building community connections to sensitive natural areas through which urban residents can positively engage with the natural environment and play a more active role in conservation. This project focuses on Tumamoc Hill, and its need to think beyond Tumamoc’s traditional “island” boundaries and a preserve & protect approach to conservation and research. It explores how UPAs are critical spaces for cultivating and disseminating ecological knowledge and strategies through which human and natural communities - which have co-evolved for 1,000’s of years - can potentially co-exist in supportive and even mutually beneficial ways. The design begins to envision how Tumamoc can cultivate community connections and creative conservation practices that will support and protect Tumamoc’s rich heritage and support conservation within its borders and even beyond.
    • Bridging the Gap with Tucson's Urban Fissure

      Rapp, Ethan Yuri (The University of Arizona., 2016)
      As cities continue to develop, they can experience changes and subsequent decline in particular industries and land uses. In some cases, structures are abandoned and vacant lots remain as remnants of past uses. In central Tucson, Arizona, there is a fragment of land that separates two important districts. The proposed site, Tucson’s Urban Fissure, can be viewed as a landscape that is underutilized, barren, scorched, and is in need of a new identity. To the north of the Urban Fissure, sits an avenue of shops and restaurants that are well established, and to the south a newly built, thriving, living, urban hub. This fissure provides an opportunity to help fuse these districts. This area has the potential to link two thriving urban nodes: Fourth Avenue and Downtown Tucson. Currently this, Urban Fissure has a set of historic train tracks running along its side. This cultural inspiration along with Iron Horse Park can be looked at as a set of catalysts that can help spur a new sense of identity for this site. Through the creation of an urban park on Tucson’s Urban Fissure, the author will provide the city of Tucson with a valuable addition to its urban fabric. Through special attention to spatial scale, circulation, shelter and refuge areas, and spatio- temporal landscape patterns, the design will realize a new image for the cavity that currently sits in between central Tucson Arizona’s most heavily used districts (4th Avenue and Downtown), while also activating the underutilized land. This work is intended to illustrate to the city how the sense of movement can bridge the gap in needed linkages within the urban fabric of Tucson.
    • BUTTE CREEK TRAILS PROJECT: A MASTER PLAN

      CLIFFORD, SARS (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    • CIUDAD DEL SABER / CITY OF KNOWLEDGE / MASTER PLAN

      SU, HYEWON (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    • CORONADO AIRPORT A Project in Flight

      Gamboa, Malerie (The University of Arizona., 2019)
      Located at the junction of different urban tracts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the abandoned Coronado Airport was once a popular small aircraft airport. Operational from 1961 to 2001, the Coronado Airport was ultimately closed due to safety concerns, a fate shared by other small aircraft facilities around the U.S. Currently the 268 acre abandoned site contains only the two runways and several large concrete foundations where the airport buildings and hangars were once located. Although in a state of disrepair and left with only remnants of its former use, the site has the opportunity to become an effective and iconic space for the City of Albuquerque and surrounding communities. The Coronado Airport redevelopment project could also provide design and reuse concepts applicable to other equivalent sites within urban areas around the country. Through visual observations and site research this is a prime location to develop multi-purpose functions including a large natural park in an urban setting, alternative forms of active and passive recreation, while acting as a landmark for the city. The Coronado Airport redevelopment project explores the challenges of creating a destination for both locals and visitors through the reuse of an abandoned site while showcasing its transformation over time and acknowledging its former use. Moreover, the design incorporates elements of this diverse landscape context, its past use as an airport, the significant role of flight in the region, and new physical and metaphorical connections that can be enhanced and created.
    • Creating a Multi-modal Transit Corridor: Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

      Alammar, Mashal Hamed (The University of Arizona., 2015)
      The aim of this research is to address the lack of transportation and connectivity in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The industrial field is the biggest investment for Saudi Arabia, and the number of commuting industrial employees has become an enormous burden on the infrastructure system. Jubail Industrial city is located in an expanding and dynamic area and contains experts, companies and colleges focusing on the industrial sector, but it is suffering from the tremendous number of mobility issues for commuters. More than 45,000 employees and students commute daily to Jubail City from Dammam, Qatif, and Ras-Al Khair, and they face many problems on their way such as traffic, accidents, and pollution. Thus, this project will address these issues, and provide a regional plan containing a multi-modal transportation corridor connected with urban hubs between Jubail and Dammam.
    • CREATING EXPERIENCES: THE CITY OF KNOWLEDGE INTERPRETIVE NETWORK

      SUSSMAN, RACHEL M. (The University of Arizona., 2002)
    • DEPOT PARK Reviving a Layered Landscape

      Marenfeld, Jonathan (The University of Arizona., 2016)
      As Tucson grows and its downtown is revitalized open spaces are quickly disappearing. The lack of open space downtown is partially due to the temporary closure of Viente de Agosto Park, the pending closure Jácome Plaza near the Main Library, and numerous development opportunities. Cities of all sizes seem to have a park that hosts events big and small and gives its residents a taste of nature in an urban environment. Many studies have shown that urban parks provide city residents social and psychological benefits while also having ecological and environmental services (Chiesura, p. 129). The goal of this project is to create an urban park for downtown Tucson that is capable of hosting events, festivals, or just lunch with a friend. The park will serve as a major stop along various established and planned routes. It will also be designed in a way that conserves water while using solar and wind technologies to reduce the need for already strained and increasingly expensive resources. To aid in the concepts and design GIS data, case reviews, and local regulations and ordinances will be explored.
    • Dog Park Design: A Successful Southwest Dog Park

      Melnick, James Harrison; Livingston, Margaret; Stoltz, Ron; Blazquez, Oscar (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      Dog parks are becoming increasingly popular in urban areas where little space is available for interactions with dogs off-leash. Dog parks should help the well-being of the owners and ensure a sense of security for themselves and their canines. However, a poorly designed dog park or dog-friendly park can be difficult to deal with and can even increase the risk of incident among dogs. This research asks how can a dog park, or dog friendly park increase the interactions between owners and maintain a positive design aesthetic while providing a functional outdoor space.
    • El Rio Preserve riparian rehabilitation & community recreation

      Stoicof, Alexandra (The University of Arizona., 2017)
      The Sonoran Desert is a unique biodiverse landscape of approximately 100,000 square miles in Southwestern United States. It is characterized by seasonal monsoon rains in both the summer and winter that sustain some 2,000 different plant species, making it a comparatively lush desert. Because of the Sonoran Desert’s geographic location and seasonal precipitation patterns, a variety of biomes can be found in the region, including tundra, coniferous forest, temperate deciduous forest, grassland, chaparral, desert, thornscrub, and tropical forest (Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, 2017). Within these biomes are corridors of riparian communities, which are areas of watercourses that create unique habitats. In the Southwest, many of these riparian watercourses are currently ephemeral and only fl ow temporarily throughout the year. These xeroriparian habitats (dry riparian) are largely and increasingly ephemeral because of human disturbances. Watercourses that once were perennial, such as the Santa Cruz River, now flow primarily only during the monsoon rains. Riparian communities are critical components in the network of biomes and habitats in the Sonoran Desert. They provide corridors for the movements of plants and animals, and sustain unique species in the desert that require more water. These communities are also beautiful, lush landscapes that are often enjoyed by humans for their oasis-like qualities; trails, camping and picnicking spots, and scenic points-of-view are often found along watercourses. The El Rio Preserve in Marana, Arizona is such a riparian community tucked along the banks of the Santa Cruz River. It is part of a chain of other regionally-significant habitats, and presents opportunities for both habitat and human recreation. Many species of plants and animals have found refuge at El Rio, including invasive species. Its origins as a former borrow pit, however, make it a disturbed xeroriparian landscape that could benefit from rehabilitation strategies. The following Master’s Report presents a process and design for El Rio. A majority of the work was done in collaboration with the Town of Marana. Public participation was a large component of the project, which informed many design decisions. A comprehensive literature and case review, and ongoing site assessments also contributed to the final design and rehabilitation strategies.
    • Envisioning Oakland: The Ballpark District

      Blazquez, Oscar; Quach, Kevin; Livingston, Margaret; Stoltz, Ronald (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      The Oakland Athletics Baseball team has been lobbying for years to move to San Jose, a wealthier city than the current one they are in. The current ballpark of the Athletics, Oakland Coliseum, opened in September 18, 1966 and has housed the Athletics ever since 1968. With many teams in Major League Baseball relocating to newer sports facilities, the Athletics would like to do the same. One possible site for the Athletics’ new sports facility is in Downtown Oakland. With the city in a state of recovery, the Athletics could potentially play a hand in the revitalization of the downtown, stimulating new growth within the city. This project intends to use the ballpark to potentially aid and accelerate growth in Downtown Oakland while strengthening Oakland’s economy. This is done by gathering research information of selected literature and review the information to inform the design. Case studies of successful ballparks and their designs follow the literature review to support the design decisions. The design process includes a site inventory and analysis, conceptual diagrams, and a master plan. The results: A newly established ballpark district that includes a Market Street redevelopment, reworked public transportation, and the expansion of the San Francisco Bay Trail among other developments.
    • The Factor of Time in the Analysis and Interpretation of Cultural Landscapes

      Erickson, Helen Breslich; Johnson, Lauri MacMillan; Jeffery, R. Brooks; O'Brien, William Patrick (The University of Arizona., 2012)
      Cultural landscapes - artifacts that display the combined work of man and nature - exist in time. Therefore their evaluation, analysis and interpretation must take place within the context of conscious or unconscious understandings of time/space relationships. Landscape architecture professionals are often wary of the preservation of historic landscapes, sensing that a living landscape cannot be frozen in time. Heritage conservationists, working within structures initially designed to serve the built environment, sometimes question the validity of a dynamic landscape as a heritage resource. Divergent developmental histories led these two disciplines to internalize distinctive understandings of the meaning of time, giving rise in the process to conflicting yet potentially complementary conservation metrics. A discussion of these separate histories and resulting concepts of time will provide a starting point for an interdisciplinary discussion about a shared resource viewed through two contrasting temporal lenses. Case studies, examined in the context of frameworks devised by the National Park Service (NPS) for the analysis of cultural resources, suggest ways to expand the existing methodology to take conscious advantage of both of these views of time. The insights of landscape architecture offer a richer, more comprehensive view of an important heritage resource, while existing NPS structures offer a recognized means of validation and support for the conservation of cultural landscapes.
    • The Hashemite University Campus Landscape Master Plan: Zarqa, Jordan

      Alrayyan, Kawthar; Livingston, Margaret; Stoltz, Ron; Blazquez, Oscar A. (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As important spaces of innovation and learning, the quality of university campuses directly affects their users. Surrounding communities are also significantly impacted by these large economic engines. In Jordan, almost one third of the population is enrolled in an educational facility. Insufficient educational facilities and increasing number of students led to the establishment of the Hashemite University (HU) in the city of Zarqa, a neighboring community of Amman, in 2000. As is the case in many universities in the kingdom of Jordan, the landscape of the campus appears neglected, treated as leftover space rather than needed functional spaces. The campus lacks a sense of place; a collegial and attractive place that creates memories. This research examines campus landscape design of Jordanian universities, with emphasis on HU. This research also assesses international trends in campus design, studying the notion of applying international standards to this Arab campus. The goal of this work is to redesign the HU campus, uncovering its unique character and improving the sense of place, purpose, and quality. Specifically, the design reconnects the university with the surrounding community and provides the area with social, psychological, and economic benefits.
    • Integrating Biophilic Principles and Therapeutic Design Elements in Outdoor Spaces for Children at Tucson Medical Center

      Davidson, Deryn; Livingston, Margaret; Livingston, Margaret; Blazquez, Oscar; Stoltz, Ronald (The University of Arizona., 2013)
      As concern for the health and wellbeing of children grows in a society geared toward a more sedentary lifestyle, many doctors and therapists are pointing to the importance of access to, and time spent interacting with the natural world. The idea of using the restorative properties of nature in healing has been around since ancient times. There is currently a renaissance in the health care industry looking at the importance of incorporating gardens into the design of health care facilities once again. This project proposes to explore the importance for children in health care facilities to have access to the natural world while using the biophilia hypothesis as a framework for design. Furthermore, the benefits of outdoor areas for the families (particularly siblings) of child patients and the staff of the health care facilities was explored. Through the use of literature and case reviews, data was collected and synthesized to determine the elements best used to strengthen the designs for children’s therapeutic environments. Outcomes include three models of therapeutic environments including focus areas for the Tucson Medical Center campus in Tucson, Arizona.