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dc.contributor.authorD'Arrigo, Rosanne D.
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, William S. F.
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, David M.
dc.contributor.authorCook, Edward R.
dc.contributor.authorWiljanen, Mark
dc.contributor.authorThetford, Roy D.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-09T20:09:19Z
dc.date.available2012-11-09T20:09:19Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationD'Arrigo, R.D., Schuster, W.S.F., Lawrence, D.M., Cook, E.R., Wiljanen, M., Thetford, R.D. 2001. Climate-growth relationships of eastern hemlock and chestnut oak from Black Rock Forest in the highlands of southeastern New York. Tree-Ring Research 57(2):183-190.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/251622
dc.description.abstractThree eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) and three chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.) ring-width chronologies were constructed from old-and second-growth stands in the Black Rock Forest in Cornwall. New York, the first developed for the highlands of southeastern New York State. The longest hemlock chronology extends from 1780-1992 and the longest oak chronology from 1806-1994. The oldest trees sampled had minimum ages of 275 and 300 years for hemlock and chestnut oak, respectively. The tree-ring chronologies were compared to monthly temperature and precipitation data from nearby West Point, NY for the 1850s-1990s and to Palmer Drought Severity Indices for 1911-1990. The chronologies provide forest growth information for the period prior to the initiation of meteorological measurements, begun in 1824 at West Point. Black Rock Forest eastern hemlock growth correlates positively with current July and prior September precipitation, with February-March temperature and with prior September Palmer Drought Severity Indices. It correlates negatively with prior June temperature. Black Rock Forest chestnut oak growth correlates positively with current June-July and prior September and December precipitation, with January temperature, and with prior September-October and current June-July Palmer Drought Severity Indices. It correlates negatively with current June-July temperature. The Black Rock Forest tree-ring records and analyses yield useful information for climate reconstruction and for assessing the potential impact of anthropogenic change (e.g. CO₂-induced climate effects, CO₂ and N fertilization, acid deposition, changes in soil chemistry due to atmospheric pollution).
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree ringsen_US
dc.titleClimate-Growth Relationships of Eastern Hemlock and Chestnut Oak from Black Rock Forest in the Highlands of Southeastern New Yorken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTree-Ring Laboratory, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NYen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBlack Rock Forest Consortium, Cornwall, NY | Department of Geography, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KYen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T21:04:02Z
html.description.abstractThree eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) and three chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.) ring-width chronologies were constructed from old-and second-growth stands in the Black Rock Forest in Cornwall. New York, the first developed for the highlands of southeastern New York State. The longest hemlock chronology extends from 1780-1992 and the longest oak chronology from 1806-1994. The oldest trees sampled had minimum ages of 275 and 300 years for hemlock and chestnut oak, respectively. The tree-ring chronologies were compared to monthly temperature and precipitation data from nearby West Point, NY for the 1850s-1990s and to Palmer Drought Severity Indices for 1911-1990. The chronologies provide forest growth information for the period prior to the initiation of meteorological measurements, begun in 1824 at West Point. Black Rock Forest eastern hemlock growth correlates positively with current July and prior September precipitation, with February-March temperature and with prior September Palmer Drought Severity Indices. It correlates negatively with prior June temperature. Black Rock Forest chestnut oak growth correlates positively with current June-July and prior September and December precipitation, with January temperature, and with prior September-October and current June-July Palmer Drought Severity Indices. It correlates negatively with current June-July temperature. The Black Rock Forest tree-ring records and analyses yield useful information for climate reconstruction and for assessing the potential impact of anthropogenic change (e.g. CO₂-induced climate effects, CO₂ and N fertilization, acid deposition, changes in soil chemistry due to atmospheric pollution).


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