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dc.contributor.advisorSchweigerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSavidis, Nickolaos
dc.creatorSavidis, Nickolaosen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-10T19:55:33Z
dc.date.available2012-12-10T19:55:33Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/255155
dc.description.abstractAdaptive optic technology has revolutionized real time correction of wavefront aberrations. Optofluidic based applied optic devices have offered an opportunity to produce flexible refractive lenses in the correction of wavefronts. Fluidic lenses have superiority relative to their solid lens counterparts in their capabilities of producing tunable optical systems, that when synchronized, can produce real time variable systems with no moving parts. We have developed optofluidic fluidic lenses for applications of applied optical devices, as well as ophthalmic optic devices. The first half of this dissertation discusses the production of fluidic lenses as optical devices. In addition, the design and testing of various fluidic systems made with these components are evaluated. We begin with the creation of spherical or defocus singlet fluidic lenses. We then produced zoom optical systems with no moving parts by synchronizing combinations of these fluidic spherical lenses. The variable power zoom system incorporates two singlet fluidic lenses that are synchronized. The coupled device has no moving parts and has produced a magnification range of 0.1 x to 10 x or a 20 x magnification range. The chapter after fluidic zoom technology focuses on producing achromatic lens designs. We offer an analysis of a hybrid diffractive and refractive achromat that offers discrete achromatized variable focal lengths. In addition, we offer a design of a fully optofluidic based achromatic lens. By synchronizing the two membrane surfaces of the fluidic achromat we develop a design for a fluidic achromatic lens.The second half of this dissertation discusses the production of optofluidic technology in ophthalmic applications. We begin with an introduction to an optofluidic phoropter system. A fluidic phoropter is designed through the combination of a defocus lens with two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45° relative to each other. Here we discuss the designs of the fluidic cylindrical lens coupled with a previously discussed defocus singlet lens. We then couple this optofluidic phoropter with relay optics and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to produce an auto-phoropter device. The auto-phoropter system combines a refractometer designed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with the compact refractive fluidic lens phoropter. This combination allows for the identification and control of ophthalmic cylinder, cylinder axis, as well as refractive error. The closed loop system of the fluidic phoropter with refractometer enables for the creation of our see-through auto-phoropter system. The design and testing of several generations of transmissive see-through auto-phoropter devices are presented in this section.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAuto-Phoropteren_US
dc.subjectFluidic Zoom Imagingen_US
dc.subjectOptofluidicsen_US
dc.subjectShack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensingen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAccomodating Achromaten_US
dc.subjectAdaptive Optic Lensesen_US
dc.titleApplication and System Design of Elastomer Based Optofluidic Lensesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyghambarian, Nasseren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeyman, Gholamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchweigerling, Jamesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T22:25:58Z
html.description.abstractAdaptive optic technology has revolutionized real time correction of wavefront aberrations. Optofluidic based applied optic devices have offered an opportunity to produce flexible refractive lenses in the correction of wavefronts. Fluidic lenses have superiority relative to their solid lens counterparts in their capabilities of producing tunable optical systems, that when synchronized, can produce real time variable systems with no moving parts. We have developed optofluidic fluidic lenses for applications of applied optical devices, as well as ophthalmic optic devices. The first half of this dissertation discusses the production of fluidic lenses as optical devices. In addition, the design and testing of various fluidic systems made with these components are evaluated. We begin with the creation of spherical or defocus singlet fluidic lenses. We then produced zoom optical systems with no moving parts by synchronizing combinations of these fluidic spherical lenses. The variable power zoom system incorporates two singlet fluidic lenses that are synchronized. The coupled device has no moving parts and has produced a magnification range of 0.1 x to 10 x or a 20 x magnification range. The chapter after fluidic zoom technology focuses on producing achromatic lens designs. We offer an analysis of a hybrid diffractive and refractive achromat that offers discrete achromatized variable focal lengths. In addition, we offer a design of a fully optofluidic based achromatic lens. By synchronizing the two membrane surfaces of the fluidic achromat we develop a design for a fluidic achromatic lens.The second half of this dissertation discusses the production of optofluidic technology in ophthalmic applications. We begin with an introduction to an optofluidic phoropter system. A fluidic phoropter is designed through the combination of a defocus lens with two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45° relative to each other. Here we discuss the designs of the fluidic cylindrical lens coupled with a previously discussed defocus singlet lens. We then couple this optofluidic phoropter with relay optics and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to produce an auto-phoropter device. The auto-phoropter system combines a refractometer designed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with the compact refractive fluidic lens phoropter. This combination allows for the identification and control of ophthalmic cylinder, cylinder axis, as well as refractive error. The closed loop system of the fluidic phoropter with refractometer enables for the creation of our see-through auto-phoropter system. The design and testing of several generations of transmissive see-through auto-phoropter devices are presented in this section.


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