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dc.contributor.authorGrissino-Mayer, Henri D.
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T19:11:39Z
dc.date.available2012-12-13T19:11:39Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationGrissino-Mayer, H.D. 2003. Canons for writing and editing manuscripts. Tree-Ring Research 59(1):3-10.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262545
dc.description.abstractWriting is much like any other activity-the more you read and write, the more proficient you become as a scientist. Here, I provide canons for writing and editing scientific papers that should help novice writers avoid common hazards that could render a manuscript unpublishable. Abstracts should be well-written and concise and contain all the major results and conclusions. The manuscript should be well organized. Sentences in all paragraphs should stick to the central theme of the paragraph. Writers should provide Latin names for species analyzed, and should use SI units in all cases. The use of bulleted lists, active voice, and commas after introductory phrases will improve the clarity of the manuscript. Tables and figures should be clear, well-organized, stand-alone accessories to the text, and usually convey data and results that are numerous or complex. Writers should avoid both plagiarism and self-plagiarism, and should have their manuscript proofread before submitting to a journal. Finally, authors should consult primary references (such as Scientific Style and Format, published by the Council of Biology Editors in 1994) to become familiar with troublesome words and phrases.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.titleCanons for Writing and Editing Manuscriptsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Science, Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennesseeen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T23:35:04Z
html.description.abstractWriting is much like any other activity-the more you read and write, the more proficient you become as a scientist. Here, I provide canons for writing and editing scientific papers that should help novice writers avoid common hazards that could render a manuscript unpublishable. Abstracts should be well-written and concise and contain all the major results and conclusions. The manuscript should be well organized. Sentences in all paragraphs should stick to the central theme of the paragraph. Writers should provide Latin names for species analyzed, and should use SI units in all cases. The use of bulleted lists, active voice, and commas after introductory phrases will improve the clarity of the manuscript. Tables and figures should be clear, well-organized, stand-alone accessories to the text, and usually convey data and results that are numerous or complex. Writers should avoid both plagiarism and self-plagiarism, and should have their manuscript proofread before submitting to a journal. Finally, authors should consult primary references (such as Scientific Style and Format, published by the Council of Biology Editors in 1994) to become familiar with troublesome words and phrases.


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