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dc.contributor.authorKilgore, Jason S.
dc.contributor.authorTelewski, Frank W.
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T23:15:33Z
dc.date.available2012-12-13T23:15:33Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationKilgore, J.S., Telewski, F.W. 2004. Climate-growth relationships for native and nonnative Pinaceae in northern Michigan's pine barrens. Tree-Ring Research 60(1):3-13.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262632
dc.description.abstractSecondary growth responses of native and nonnative trees exposed to the same climatic conditions can elucidate sensitivities and thus adaptability to a particular region. A long-term mixed-species planting in the pine barrens of northern lower Michigan presented an opportunity to discriminate responses from species commonly planted in this region. Mean ring-width chronologies from living native Pinus resinosa Ait. and P. strobus L. and nonnative P. sylvestris L. and Picea abies (L.) Karst. at this plantation were generated, standardized, and analyzed by correlation analysis against mean monthly climatic variables. The native pine chronologies had the highest mean ring widths and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), were highly correlated to each other, and exhibited positive responses to years with above-normal April temperatures but no significant relationships to variations in precipitation. The P. sylvestris chronology was highly correlated to the other two pine chronologies and responded similarly to April temperatures but exhibited negative correlations to January and April precipitation and positive correlations to September precipitation. The P. abies chronology had the highest mean sensitivity and was correlated with the P. strobus chronology but only responded positively to precipitation from the previous December. The low SNR (P. sylvestris, P. abies), high mean sensitivity (P. abies), and larger number of significant correlations to variations in monthly climatic variables (P. sylvestris) suggest that these nonnative species are more sensitive to this local climate. These results provide insights to the adaptability, establishment, and geographic distribution of the nonnative Pinaceae.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectGrowth Responseen_US
dc.subjectNativeen_US
dc.subjectExoticen_US
dc.subjectPine Barrensen_US
dc.subjectDendroecologyen_US
dc.subjectMichiganen_US
dc.titleClimate-Growth Relationships for Native and Nonnative Pinaceae in Northern Michigan's Pine Barrensen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentW. J. Beal Botanical Garden, Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824en_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-26T23:37:01Z
html.description.abstractSecondary growth responses of native and nonnative trees exposed to the same climatic conditions can elucidate sensitivities and thus adaptability to a particular region. A long-term mixed-species planting in the pine barrens of northern lower Michigan presented an opportunity to discriminate responses from species commonly planted in this region. Mean ring-width chronologies from living native Pinus resinosa Ait. and P. strobus L. and nonnative P. sylvestris L. and Picea abies (L.) Karst. at this plantation were generated, standardized, and analyzed by correlation analysis against mean monthly climatic variables. The native pine chronologies had the highest mean ring widths and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), were highly correlated to each other, and exhibited positive responses to years with above-normal April temperatures but no significant relationships to variations in precipitation. The P. sylvestris chronology was highly correlated to the other two pine chronologies and responded similarly to April temperatures but exhibited negative correlations to January and April precipitation and positive correlations to September precipitation. The P. abies chronology had the highest mean sensitivity and was correlated with the P. strobus chronology but only responded positively to precipitation from the previous December. The low SNR (P. sylvestris, P. abies), high mean sensitivity (P. abies), and larger number of significant correlations to variations in monthly climatic variables (P. sylvestris) suggest that these nonnative species are more sensitive to this local climate. These results provide insights to the adaptability, establishment, and geographic distribution of the nonnative Pinaceae.


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