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dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Gregg R.
dc.contributor.authorLaine, Brian C.
dc.contributor.authorGalicki, Stanley J.
dc.contributor.authorThrelkeld, Stephen T.
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-14T00:17:01Z
dc.date.available2012-12-14T00:17:01Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationDavidson, G.R., Laine, B.C., Galicki, S.J., Threlkeld, S.T. 2006. Root-zone hydrology: Why bald-cypress in flooded wetlands grow more when it rains. Tree-Ring Research 62(1):3-12.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262641
dc.description.abstractBald cypress (Taxodium distichum) is known to respond to increases in precipitation with increased radial growth even when rooted in continuously saturated sediments where water is not a growth-limiting factor. Measurements of δ¹⁸O, Cl⁻, ³H and hydraulic head in surface water and shallow groundwater in an oxbow lake-wetland in northern Mississippi show that rapid downward flow of surface water into the root zone is initiated only after precipitation-induced increases in surface water depth exceed a threshold value. Rapid flow of surface water through the root zone has the potential to introduce oxygen to sediments that would otherwise be anoxic, facilitating nutrient uptake and growth. Climatic reconstruction using tree rings from bald cypress in this environment appears possible because increases in precipitation generally correlate well with increases in water level, which in turn enhances the delivery of oxygenated water to the roots.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectBald Cypressen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitationen_US
dc.subjectGrowthen_US
dc.subjectHydrologyen_US
dc.subjectWetlanden_US
dc.subjectOxbow Lakeen_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.titleRoot-Zone Hydrology: Why Bald-Cypress in Flooded Wetlands Grow More When It Rainsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Mississippi, Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, University, MS 38677en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMillsaps College, Jackson, MS 39210en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Mississippi, Department of Biology, University, MS 38677en_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T17:04:55Z
html.description.abstractBald cypress (Taxodium distichum) is known to respond to increases in precipitation with increased radial growth even when rooted in continuously saturated sediments where water is not a growth-limiting factor. Measurements of δ¹⁸O, Cl⁻, ³H and hydraulic head in surface water and shallow groundwater in an oxbow lake-wetland in northern Mississippi show that rapid downward flow of surface water into the root zone is initiated only after precipitation-induced increases in surface water depth exceed a threshold value. Rapid flow of surface water through the root zone has the potential to introduce oxygen to sediments that would otherwise be anoxic, facilitating nutrient uptake and growth. Climatic reconstruction using tree rings from bald cypress in this environment appears possible because increases in precipitation generally correlate well with increases in water level, which in turn enhances the delivery of oxygenated water to the roots.


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