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dc.contributor.advisorLe Hir, Marie-Pierreen_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Amandine
dc.creatorAndrade, Amandineen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-06T21:36:47Z
dc.date.available2013-02-06T21:36:47Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/268573
dc.description.abstractIf one of the first accomplishments of the French Revolution was to prohibit torture, attempts to abolish the death penalty in the early years of the Revolution proved unsuccessful. As a result, the function of executioner survived, but the executioner's job description and his status changed considerably. The prohibition of torture led to the banishment of the term "bourreau;" the guillotine, adopted in 1792, made executions less cruel and more egalitarian; and the executioner, a full-fledged citizen since 1790, ceased to act as the "hand" of the king striking on behalf of God, to become the last link of the judiciary. One could therefore expect the executioner to disappear into the mass of anonymous civil servants, particularly since the number of executions steadily declined over the course of the nineteenth century. But the opposite is the case: the "bourreau" haunts the literary imagination of the period. Most of the texts by Balzac, Hugo, and Sanson examined in this dissertation have in common an effort on the part of narrators to convince the reader that executioners are not monsters but good and sensitive human beings. The goal of this dissertation is to explain this paradox. In Chapter I, which is devoted to Balzac's Memoirs of Sanson and An Episode Under the Terror, we show the Romantic portrayal of the executioner to be part of the royalist policies of commemoration of the regicide, of the dominant political discourse of the time that placed the blame for the regicide on the Convention. In Chapter II, we trace the evolution of Victor Hugo's thinking on the death penalty from Han d'Islande, with its sensitive executioner, to The Last Day of a Condemned Man, and its firm and unequivocal stand against the death penalty on moral grounds, and to Claude Gueux, an analysis of crimes and punishments in their social context. In chapter III, devoted to the Memoirs of the Sansons, we examine the reasons for the success of this work published by an ex-executioner in 1862, decades after the official disappearance of the "bourreau."
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectFrenchen_US
dc.titleLe Bourreau, Figure Emblématique du Débat Sur la Peine de Mort au Dix-Neuvième Siècleen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeibacher, Liseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGinnis, Reginalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLe Hir, Marie-Pierreen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFrenchen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T01:19:15Z
html.description.abstractIf one of the first accomplishments of the French Revolution was to prohibit torture, attempts to abolish the death penalty in the early years of the Revolution proved unsuccessful. As a result, the function of executioner survived, but the executioner's job description and his status changed considerably. The prohibition of torture led to the banishment of the term "bourreau;" the guillotine, adopted in 1792, made executions less cruel and more egalitarian; and the executioner, a full-fledged citizen since 1790, ceased to act as the "hand" of the king striking on behalf of God, to become the last link of the judiciary. One could therefore expect the executioner to disappear into the mass of anonymous civil servants, particularly since the number of executions steadily declined over the course of the nineteenth century. But the opposite is the case: the "bourreau" haunts the literary imagination of the period. Most of the texts by Balzac, Hugo, and Sanson examined in this dissertation have in common an effort on the part of narrators to convince the reader that executioners are not monsters but good and sensitive human beings. The goal of this dissertation is to explain this paradox. In Chapter I, which is devoted to Balzac's Memoirs of Sanson and An Episode Under the Terror, we show the Romantic portrayal of the executioner to be part of the royalist policies of commemoration of the regicide, of the dominant political discourse of the time that placed the blame for the regicide on the Convention. In Chapter II, we trace the evolution of Victor Hugo's thinking on the death penalty from Han d'Islande, with its sensitive executioner, to The Last Day of a Condemned Man, and its firm and unequivocal stand against the death penalty on moral grounds, and to Claude Gueux, an analysis of crimes and punishments in their social context. In chapter III, devoted to the Memoirs of the Sansons, we examine the reasons for the success of this work published by an ex-executioner in 1862, decades after the official disappearance of the "bourreau."


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