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dc.contributor.authorPodolsky, Alexander Thomas
dc.creatorPodolsky, Alexander Thomasen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-12T17:45:07Z
dc.date.available2013-03-12T17:45:07Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationPodolsky, Alexander Thomas. (2010). No Antifreeze, No Problem: An Invertebrate Shows Cryobiosis Without Cryoprotectants (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/271937
dc.description.abstractBdelloid rotifers are asexual, microscopic invertebrates that exhibit the ability to survive the most extreme conditions. Work in our lab showed that bdelloids could survive freezing at -80°C and - 195°C, with the survival rates ranging from 10-94% at -80°C. This poses an interesting phenomenon because current research has been unable to identify any osmoprotectant or cryoprotectant molecules that would aid this process. The goal of the research presented here was to examine any genotypic differences in freezing survival both among and within species of bdelloids. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences in freezing survival rates in both cases.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleNo Antifreeze, No Problem: An Invertebrate Shows Cryobiosis Without Cryoprotectantsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T15:49:59Z
html.description.abstractBdelloid rotifers are asexual, microscopic invertebrates that exhibit the ability to survive the most extreme conditions. Work in our lab showed that bdelloids could survive freezing at -80°C and - 195°C, with the survival rates ranging from 10-94% at -80°C. This poses an interesting phenomenon because current research has been unable to identify any osmoprotectant or cryoprotectant molecules that would aid this process. The goal of the research presented here was to examine any genotypic differences in freezing survival both among and within species of bdelloids. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences in freezing survival rates in both cases.


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