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dc.contributor.authorAlderman, Jay Allen, 1961-en_US
dc.creatorAlderman, Jay Allen, 1961-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:06:21Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:06:21Z
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276485
dc.description.abstractI studied diel activity patterns of female desert bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis mexicana) in the Little Harquahala Mountains, Arizona, July 1985-June 1986. Diurnal activity patterns were similar throughout the year. Nocturnal activity patterns were similar for all seasons except spring when activity significantly (P = 0.003) decreased. Bighorn sheep were active an average of 39 and 33% of any given hour during the day and night, respectively. Diurnal ambient temperatures and relative humidity were significantly (P ≤ 0.048) correlated with bighorn sheep activity during all seasons. Bighorn sheep spent a majority of the time foraging in the fall and winter, but spent more time resting during spring and summer. Bighorn sheep obtain water in their food throughout the day; percent moisture content of forage species remained high (≥ 32%) for any given hour of the day throughout the year.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBighorn sheep.en_US
dc.subjectDesert bighorn sheep.en_US
dc.subjectDesert animals -- Arizona -- Little Harquahala Mountains -- Physiology.en_US
dc.titleDIEL ACTIVITY OF FEMALE DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP IN WESTERN ARIZONAen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17497480en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331437en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16311814en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16311802en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T07:54:13Z
html.description.abstractI studied diel activity patterns of female desert bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis mexicana) in the Little Harquahala Mountains, Arizona, July 1985-June 1986. Diurnal activity patterns were similar throughout the year. Nocturnal activity patterns were similar for all seasons except spring when activity significantly (P = 0.003) decreased. Bighorn sheep were active an average of 39 and 33% of any given hour during the day and night, respectively. Diurnal ambient temperatures and relative humidity were significantly (P ≤ 0.048) correlated with bighorn sheep activity during all seasons. Bighorn sheep spent a majority of the time foraging in the fall and winter, but spent more time resting during spring and summer. Bighorn sheep obtain water in their food throughout the day; percent moisture content of forage species remained high (≥ 32%) for any given hour of the day throughout the year.


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