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dc.contributor.advisorOlsen, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Daniel Gordon, 1963-
dc.creatorMartin, Daniel Gordon, 1963-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:11:11Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:11:11Z
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276621
dc.description.abstractWithin the past 100 years, the protection of archaeological and other cultural resources have fallen in part under federal jurisdiction. The role of federal legislation and regulations, with particular emphasis on the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA), is evaluated in terms of guidelines, application, and effectiveness. A history of federal legislation is presented, followed by an in-depth review and analysis of ARPA. The relevance and applicability of ARPA and other legislation is reviewed in terms of resource significance, definitions of archaeological material, logistics of law enforcement, and prosecution of violators. A case review is presented and analyzed. The roles of public archaeology and future legislation are discussed as they apply to continued efforts toward preservation of cultural resources.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectArchaeology -- Law and legislation -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectCultural property -- Protection -- Law and legislation -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectHistoric sites -- Law and legislation -- United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Archaeological Resources Protection Act, other federal legislation, and the protection of cultural resources in the United Statesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19293541en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332532en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16747719en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-16T17:06:03Z
html.description.abstractWithin the past 100 years, the protection of archaeological and other cultural resources have fallen in part under federal jurisdiction. The role of federal legislation and regulations, with particular emphasis on the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA), is evaluated in terms of guidelines, application, and effectiveness. A history of federal legislation is presented, followed by an in-depth review and analysis of ARPA. The relevance and applicability of ARPA and other legislation is reviewed in terms of resource significance, definitions of archaeological material, logistics of law enforcement, and prosecution of violators. A case review is presented and analyzed. The roles of public archaeology and future legislation are discussed as they apply to continued efforts toward preservation of cultural resources.


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