Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSternberg, Ben K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSutter, Timothy Charles, 1948-
dc.creatorSutter, Timothy Charles, 1948-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:11:30Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:11:30Z
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276631
dc.description.abstractGround water in excess of one million years old may now be accurately age dated by using the radionuclide Chlorine 36 (36Cl), which has a half-life of 3.01 x 105 years. To maintain a high degree of accuracy in the resultant age it is necessary to take into account the buildup of 36Cl, which is due to thermal neutron activation of 35Cl to 36Cl. The purpose of this research is to determine the thermal neutron flux in various geochemical subsurface environments by conducting field measurements of thermal neutron production rates at discrete locations. These data are then compared with the theoretical thermal neutron flux calculated for each location. The field measurements were conducted from the surface to a maximum depth of 44 meters in a copper, silver and zinc mine. The measured thermal neutron flux was found to be larger than the theoretical thermal neutron flux by a factor of from three to six when below 17 meters depth.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectChlorine -- Isotopes.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater -- Dating.en_US
dc.titleSubsurface thermal neutron production ratesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20083571en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332544en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16919403en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T08:34:35Z
html.description.abstractGround water in excess of one million years old may now be accurately age dated by using the radionuclide Chlorine 36 (36Cl), which has a half-life of 3.01 x 105 years. To maintain a high degree of accuracy in the resultant age it is necessary to take into account the buildup of 36Cl, which is due to thermal neutron activation of 35Cl to 36Cl. The purpose of this research is to determine the thermal neutron flux in various geochemical subsurface environments by conducting field measurements of thermal neutron production rates at discrete locations. These data are then compared with the theoretical thermal neutron flux calculated for each location. The field measurements were conducted from the surface to a maximum depth of 44 meters in a copper, silver and zinc mine. The measured thermal neutron flux was found to be larger than the theoretical thermal neutron flux by a factor of from three to six when below 17 meters depth.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_1332544_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
1.553Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record