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dc.contributor.advisorKay, Margarita A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Sandra Gonzalez
dc.creatorMarshall, Sandra Gonzalezen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:12:07Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:12:07Z
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276643
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among different levels of acculturation on the childbearing beliefs and practices of pregnant Mexican American adolescents living in Southwest border regions. A descriptive correlational design was used in this study. Three instruments were used to collect data. A total of 73 pregnant Mexican American adolescents participated in the study. The Laredo sample and the Tucson sample were identified as true bicultural samples. The El Paso group was identified as a Mexican-oriented bicultural sample. All geographical areas had an equal acceptance of traditional Mexican medicine and biomedical beliefs. Laredo and Tucson adolesents' beliefs in the traditional Mexican childbearing culture was directly related to their acculturation level. For the El Paso group, there was a low negative correlation which indicated that being more or less acculturated did not necessarily affect the adolescents' beliefs in the traditional Mexican childbearing culture.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American teenagers -- Health and hygiene -- Texas -- Laredo.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American teenagers -- Health and hygiene -- Texas -- El Paso.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American teenagers -- Health and hygiene -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectTeenage pregnancy -- Texas -- Laredo -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectTeenage pregnancy -- Texas -- El Paso -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectTeenage pregnancy -- Arizona -- Tucson -- Psychologial aspects.en_US
dc.titleThe childbearing beliefs and practices of pregnant Mexican-American adolescents living in Southwest border regionsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21055430en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332973en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17152148en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17151727en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T08:38:18Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among different levels of acculturation on the childbearing beliefs and practices of pregnant Mexican American adolescents living in Southwest border regions. A descriptive correlational design was used in this study. Three instruments were used to collect data. A total of 73 pregnant Mexican American adolescents participated in the study. The Laredo sample and the Tucson sample were identified as true bicultural samples. The El Paso group was identified as a Mexican-oriented bicultural sample. All geographical areas had an equal acceptance of traditional Mexican medicine and biomedical beliefs. Laredo and Tucson adolesents' beliefs in the traditional Mexican childbearing culture was directly related to their acculturation level. For the El Paso group, there was a low negative correlation which indicated that being more or less acculturated did not necessarily affect the adolescents' beliefs in the traditional Mexican childbearing culture.


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