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dc.contributor.advisorAamodt, Agnes M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNeal, Diana Odland
dc.creatorNeal, Diana Odlanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:17:53Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:17:53Z
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276799
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess if preterm infants receiving an intervention of intermittent human tactile contact would demonstrate clinical improvement over infants who did not receive the intervention. A quasi-experimental design was used with 26 infants between 28 and 32 weeks gestation. Hands were placed on the infants' heads and lower backs for a total of 36 minutes of tactile contact a day for 10 days. Findings indicated a significant gain in mean body weight for both groups between Day 0 and Day 10. Also, there was a significant decrease in mean hematocrit in the control group between Day 0 and Day 10. On Day 10, experimental infants had a significantly higher mean number of apneic and bradycardic episodes than control infants. There were no significant mean differences between the groups for body weight, body temperature stability, oxygen variance, or hematocrit. Data suggest that gentle human touch may be correlated with desireable outcomes. Further research is necessary.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPremature infants -- Development.en_US
dc.subjectInfant psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPremature infants -- Hospital care.en_US
dc.titleThe physiological effects of a nursing intervention of intermittent human tactile contact on preterm infantsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20381820en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334357en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16990080en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-03T16:08:12Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess if preterm infants receiving an intervention of intermittent human tactile contact would demonstrate clinical improvement over infants who did not receive the intervention. A quasi-experimental design was used with 26 infants between 28 and 32 weeks gestation. Hands were placed on the infants' heads and lower backs for a total of 36 minutes of tactile contact a day for 10 days. Findings indicated a significant gain in mean body weight for both groups between Day 0 and Day 10. Also, there was a significant decrease in mean hematocrit in the control group between Day 0 and Day 10. On Day 10, experimental infants had a significantly higher mean number of apneic and bradycardic episodes than control infants. There were no significant mean differences between the groups for body weight, body temperature stability, oxygen variance, or hematocrit. Data suggest that gentle human touch may be correlated with desireable outcomes. Further research is necessary.


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