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dc.contributor.advisorArnold, Robert G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Steven Dwight, 1961-
dc.creatorPrice, Steven Dwight, 1961-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-28T10:25:21Z
dc.date.available2013-03-28T10:25:21Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/277006
dc.description.abstractCorrosion of concrete sewer crowns will cost the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County approximately $150 million for repairs to their deteriorating sewage system. Other parts of the country are experiencing similar problems. Crown corrosion is induced by microbial oxidation of reduced sulfur to sulfuric acid, which attacks the concrete. Bacteria, of the genus Thiobacillus are generally responsible for catalyzing these reactions. Thiobacillicollected from sewers were used to establish stoichiometry and biochemical aspects of sulfide oxidation. Metals inhibition was studied among the same cultures. Thiobacilli collected from extremely corroded sewers possess a greater tolerance for metals than those from lightly corroded areas. Acidophilic isolates grow at greater rates and oxidize sulfide more efficiently than non-acidophiles. Chemical inhibitor studies indicated that S(-II) oxidation is tightly linked to respiration by T. thiooxidans. It is doubtful that initial steps in bacterially catalyzed S(-II) oxidation are linked to oxidative phosphorylation.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSewers, Concrete -- California -- Los Angeles County.en_US
dc.subjectConcrete -- Corrosion.en_US
dc.titleMicrobial catalyzed acid production in Los Angeles County sewersen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21654178en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336711en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18413882en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T05:45:02Z
html.description.abstractCorrosion of concrete sewer crowns will cost the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County approximately $150 million for repairs to their deteriorating sewage system. Other parts of the country are experiencing similar problems. Crown corrosion is induced by microbial oxidation of reduced sulfur to sulfuric acid, which attacks the concrete. Bacteria, of the genus Thiobacillus are generally responsible for catalyzing these reactions. Thiobacillicollected from sewers were used to establish stoichiometry and biochemical aspects of sulfide oxidation. Metals inhibition was studied among the same cultures. Thiobacilli collected from extremely corroded sewers possess a greater tolerance for metals than those from lightly corroded areas. Acidophilic isolates grow at greater rates and oxidize sulfide more efficiently than non-acidophiles. Chemical inhibitor studies indicated that S(-II) oxidation is tightly linked to respiration by T. thiooxidans. It is doubtful that initial steps in bacterially catalyzed S(-II) oxidation are linked to oxidative phosphorylation.


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