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dc.contributor.advisorBraden, Carrie Joen_US
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, Joyce, 1934-
dc.creatorHubbard, Joyce, 1934-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:02:02Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:02:02Zen
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/277794en
dc.description.abstractSix young women from a remote Tarahumara pueblo are functioning as village health workers. Through qualitative research techniques informed by symbolic interactionism, the investigator has sought to determine what it is like for these women living in a pre-Columbian society to develop this new role. Some issues guiding the research were; education, families' reactions to the new role, perceived changes in the health status of the pueblo and current attitudes of village health workers toward their new role. Although it was difficult for these women to respond to abstract questions regarding their feelings and emotions, rich descriptive data emerged outlining the women's perceptions of the village health worker role and its effects on their families and the community. The major themes that emerged during this research were; "wanting to learn more;" "less sickness and death among children;" "personal hygiene has changed lives;" and "medicine is gaining acceptance."
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.titleA descriptive study of the developing role of village health workers in a remote Tarahumara puebloen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341277en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26341529en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T23:37:13Z
html.description.abstractSix young women from a remote Tarahumara pueblo are functioning as village health workers. Through qualitative research techniques informed by symbolic interactionism, the investigator has sought to determine what it is like for these women living in a pre-Columbian society to develop this new role. Some issues guiding the research were; education, families' reactions to the new role, perceived changes in the health status of the pueblo and current attitudes of village health workers toward their new role. Although it was difficult for these women to respond to abstract questions regarding their feelings and emotions, rich descriptive data emerged outlining the women's perceptions of the village health worker role and its effects on their families and the community. The major themes that emerged during this research were; "wanting to learn more;" "less sickness and death among children;" "personal hygiene has changed lives;" and "medicine is gaining acceptance."


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