Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLauver, Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.authorFarris, Kristin Kay, 1964-
dc.creatorFarris, Kristin Kay, 1964-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:04:39Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:04:39Z
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/277872
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the personality characteristics of Christian counselors and determined whether those characteristics could be employed to predict job satisfaction. The objectives of the study included determining if Christian counselors differ from the general population on any of the nine personality traits found in the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis and determining if a correlation exists between the nine traits and reported job satisfaction. Data was collected from 51 self-identified Christian counselors from Arizona and California. The results indicate that Christian counselors are more expressive-responsive and less depressive and subjective than the general population. While those Christian counselors who indicated high job satisfaction tended to be less depressive and subjective and more expressive-responsive than those who indicated medium or low job satisfaction, it was shown that personality traits are not predictive of job satisfaction in Christian counselors.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Religious.en_US
dc.titlePersonality characteristics of Christian counselors as a predictor of job satisfactionen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343809en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26882371en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T11:34:12Z
html.description.abstractThis study examined the personality characteristics of Christian counselors and determined whether those characteristics could be employed to predict job satisfaction. The objectives of the study included determining if Christian counselors differ from the general population on any of the nine personality traits found in the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis and determining if a correlation exists between the nine traits and reported job satisfaction. Data was collected from 51 self-identified Christian counselors from Arizona and California. The results indicate that Christian counselors are more expressive-responsive and less depressive and subjective than the general population. While those Christian counselors who indicated high job satisfaction tended to be less depressive and subjective and more expressive-responsive than those who indicated medium or low job satisfaction, it was shown that personality traits are not predictive of job satisfaction in Christian counselors.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_1343809_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
978.6Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record