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dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGeldreich, Adam Arnold, 1954-
dc.creatorGeldreich, Adam Arnold, 1954-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:15:54Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:15:54Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278190
dc.description.abstractIndian Claims in the United States Court of Claims possess the unique quality of close congressional scrutiny. Because of the long-standing legislative relationship existing between the legislative branch and Indian tribal groups, the experiences of tribes in the Court of Claims held particular dynamics which were exclusively distinctive in many ways. It is my hypothesis that congressional plenary power over Indian tribes and the influential legislative control which Congress exercised over the Court of Claims combined to put Indians in a litigatory environment which doomed the possibility for the majority of tribes to achieve successful redress of grievances.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.titleThe role of congressional control in the adjudication of Indian claims in the United States Court of Claimsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1349479en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27702443en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T13:31:59Z
html.description.abstractIndian Claims in the United States Court of Claims possess the unique quality of close congressional scrutiny. Because of the long-standing legislative relationship existing between the legislative branch and Indian tribal groups, the experiences of tribes in the Court of Claims held particular dynamics which were exclusively distinctive in many ways. It is my hypothesis that congressional plenary power over Indian tribes and the influential legislative control which Congress exercised over the Court of Claims combined to put Indians in a litigatory environment which doomed the possibility for the majority of tribes to achieve successful redress of grievances.


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