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dc.contributor.advisorHarrison, Elizabeth G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKrumrey, Brett Alan, 1968-
dc.creatorKrumrey, Brett Alan, 1968-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:21:56Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:21:56Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278364
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the Romaji Movement and its role in the reform of the Japanese written language during the Allied Occupation of Japan (1945-1952). Past analyses concerning the Romaji Movement have suggested that romanization failed due to conspiracies against it and have neglected to consider other alternatives being pursued by the Japanese government. This paper will take a closer look at the Americans who supported romanization, their motivations for doing so, and the development of SCAP policy towards language reform. Since simplification, not romanization, was the preferred objective of both the American and the Japanese governments, this paper goes on to examine alternative methods to simplification which, in the end, proved to be highly successful.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Asia, Australia and Oceania.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, General.en_US
dc.titleJapanese written language reforms during the Allied Occupation (1945-1952): SCAP and romanizationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1355111en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31146776en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-16T21:49:37Z
html.description.abstractThis paper discusses the Romaji Movement and its role in the reform of the Japanese written language during the Allied Occupation of Japan (1945-1952). Past analyses concerning the Romaji Movement have suggested that romanization failed due to conspiracies against it and have neglected to consider other alternatives being pursued by the Japanese government. This paper will take a closer look at the Americans who supported romanization, their motivations for doing so, and the development of SCAP policy towards language reform. Since simplification, not romanization, was the preferred objective of both the American and the Japanese governments, this paper goes on to examine alternative methods to simplification which, in the end, proved to be highly successful.


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