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dc.contributor.advisorBernays, Elizabeth A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGeitzenauer, Heather Lyn, 1969-
dc.creatorGeitzenauer, Heather Lyn, 1969-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:22:19Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:22:19Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278376
dc.description.abstractThe effects of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and groundcherry (Physalis pubescens), two hosts of the tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), on predation by paper wasps (Polistes arizonensis) were examined. Initially it was found that P. arizonensis foragers took more caterpillars from H. annuus plants than P. pubescens in paired-choice tests. Regarding physical aspects of the plants, wasps took longer to locate prey on artificial plants with higher leaf surface areas and gave up searching faster on artificial plants with more complex architectures. In paired-choice tests for chemical effects, wasps chose more caterpillars within H. annuus odor than in P. pubescens odor. They also chose more H. annuus-reared larvae than P. pubescens-reared larvae when they were presented without plants. Predator handling times were affected by the amount of food in the caterpillar gut, with a slight trend depending on what plant species was present in the caterpillar gut.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
dc.titleTritrophic interactions: Effects of caterpillar host plants on predatory paper waspsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356787en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31441282en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T22:56:58Z
html.description.abstractThe effects of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and groundcherry (Physalis pubescens), two hosts of the tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), on predation by paper wasps (Polistes arizonensis) were examined. Initially it was found that P. arizonensis foragers took more caterpillars from H. annuus plants than P. pubescens in paired-choice tests. Regarding physical aspects of the plants, wasps took longer to locate prey on artificial plants with higher leaf surface areas and gave up searching faster on artificial plants with more complex architectures. In paired-choice tests for chemical effects, wasps chose more caterpillars within H. annuus odor than in P. pubescens odor. They also chose more H. annuus-reared larvae than P. pubescens-reared larvae when they were presented without plants. Predator handling times were affected by the amount of food in the caterpillar gut, with a slight trend depending on what plant species was present in the caterpillar gut.


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