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dc.contributor.advisorBirkby, Walter H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAckermann, Rebecca Rogers, 1969-
dc.creatorAckermann, Rebecca Rogers, 1969-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:23:42Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:23:42Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278413
dc.description.abstractForensic anthropology is an applied science sorely lacking in theoretical underpinnings, despite the fact that forensic anthropologists have unique, albeit usually fleeting, access to modern skeletal remains. By constructing a database of three-dimensional images, such remains can be accessed indefinitely. I have proposed a method for just such imaging, using Macintosh hardware and NIH Image software to digitally preserve remains using red-blue three-dimensional imaging techniques. Additionally, I address the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of these images. By creating this type of forensic database, anthropologists can then reformulate outdated methodologies that address issues like populational variance, thereby using modern forensic skeletal remains to better understand some of the fundamental theoretical issues within anthropology.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Physical.en_US
dc.subjectComputer Science.en_US
dc.titleFrom calipers to computers: Three-dimensional imaging in forensic anthropologyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357288en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b31914056en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T14:28:14Z
html.description.abstractForensic anthropology is an applied science sorely lacking in theoretical underpinnings, despite the fact that forensic anthropologists have unique, albeit usually fleeting, access to modern skeletal remains. By constructing a database of three-dimensional images, such remains can be accessed indefinitely. I have proposed a method for just such imaging, using Macintosh hardware and NIH Image software to digitally preserve remains using red-blue three-dimensional imaging techniques. Additionally, I address the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of these images. By creating this type of forensic database, anthropologists can then reformulate outdated methodologies that address issues like populational variance, thereby using modern forensic skeletal remains to better understand some of the fundamental theoretical issues within anthropology.


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