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dc.contributor.advisorMaughan, O. Eugeneen_US
dc.contributor.authorOtis, Edward Osgood, 1965-
dc.creatorOtis, Edward Osgood, 1965-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:23:57Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:23:57Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278418
dc.description.abstractBrown and rainbow trout perennially dominated Bright Angel Creek; native species (flannelmouth and bluehead suckers) generally occurred only during spawning (March and April-May, respectively) and initial rearing of juveniles (bluehead sucker only). Flannelmouth suckers spawned at depths between 20-40 cm, currents between 0.4-0.8 m/sec, and over loosely compacted substrates (gravel, rock). Speckled dace abundance had markedly decreased since previous investigations, possibly due to brown trout becoming the dominant predator in the stream. Four native and 6 non-native species were taken in Kanab Creek; spawning was documented for bluehead sucker and speckled dace. Small bluehead suckers (160 mm) were perennial residents below a barrier 6.2 km above the mouth. Larger individuals (>200 mm) were absent in winter, but spawned in the lower 3.2 km of the stream in April and early May. Bluehead suckers spawned in shallow waters (25 cm), slow currents (0.25 m/sec), and over loosely compacted substrates (pebble, gravel).
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.titleDistribution, abundance, and composition of fishes in Bright Angel and Kanab creeks, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357295en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3191519xen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T14:32:08Z
html.description.abstractBrown and rainbow trout perennially dominated Bright Angel Creek; native species (flannelmouth and bluehead suckers) generally occurred only during spawning (March and April-May, respectively) and initial rearing of juveniles (bluehead sucker only). Flannelmouth suckers spawned at depths between 20-40 cm, currents between 0.4-0.8 m/sec, and over loosely compacted substrates (gravel, rock). Speckled dace abundance had markedly decreased since previous investigations, possibly due to brown trout becoming the dominant predator in the stream. Four native and 6 non-native species were taken in Kanab Creek; spawning was documented for bluehead sucker and speckled dace. Small bluehead suckers (160 mm) were perennial residents below a barrier 6.2 km above the mouth. Larger individuals (>200 mm) were absent in winter, but spawned in the lower 3.2 km of the stream in April and early May. Bluehead suckers spawned in shallow waters (25 cm), slow currents (0.25 m/sec), and over loosely compacted substrates (pebble, gravel).


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