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dc.contributor.advisorStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuschbeck, Elke Karin Ursula, 1967-
dc.creatorBuschbeck, Elke Karin Ursula, 1967-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:24:30Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:24:30Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278434
dc.description.abstractIn Diptera, small-field retinotopic neurons supply achromatic motion sensitive neurons in the lobula plate, a region thought to control stabilization of yaw, pitch, and roll during flight. If different body shapes, and the flight performance associated with them, place specific demands on the design of control pathways, it might be expected that flies with long bodies and high aerodynamic pitch stability would show specific differences in the organization of such magnocellular achromatic networks. Striking differences emerge in the comparison of 9 species. Tipulids and culicids possess small non-stratified lobula plates, containing only 2-3 large diameter neurons. In syrphids, all VS cells have wide diameters and overlapping fields covering 2-3 times more of the mosaic than those of calliphorids. In asilids (robber flies) vertical cells cannot be identified. Despite these differences, we observe a conserved relationship between terminals of lamina afferents with neurons in the medulla.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
dc.titleConservation of "magnocellular" neurons of the dipteran optomotor pathway: Evolutionary and functional implicationsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358103en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b32010072en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T14:30:45Z
html.description.abstractIn Diptera, small-field retinotopic neurons supply achromatic motion sensitive neurons in the lobula plate, a region thought to control stabilization of yaw, pitch, and roll during flight. If different body shapes, and the flight performance associated with them, place specific demands on the design of control pathways, it might be expected that flies with long bodies and high aerodynamic pitch stability would show specific differences in the organization of such magnocellular achromatic networks. Striking differences emerge in the comparison of 9 species. Tipulids and culicids possess small non-stratified lobula plates, containing only 2-3 large diameter neurons. In syrphids, all VS cells have wide diameters and overlapping fields covering 2-3 times more of the mosaic than those of calliphorids. In asilids (robber flies) vertical cells cannot be identified. Despite these differences, we observe a conserved relationship between terminals of lamina afferents with neurons in the medulla.


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