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dc.contributor.advisorUhlmann, Donald R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFruitman, Clinton, 1946-*
dc.creatorFruitman, Clinton, 1946-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:25:52Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:25:52Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278471
dc.description.abstractVarious coolant chemicals are known to have enhancing and suppressing effects on wear and the quality of finish, but little has been understood about the nature of these effects. Studies were performed to examine the effects of pH and surface bias on wear, subsurface damage, and the various theories of chemical interaction with the wear process. Results of this examination of wear suggest that chemical adsorbates can play a significant role in wear fracturing. Previous observations of plastic mechanisms in brittle wear have lead tribologists to suggest that chemically induced changes in plasticity are the cause of these effects. Instead, this thesis contends occurrence of plastic effects to be by-product of localized hydrostatic compression and insufficient stress intensity to cause fracture. Crack rates and stress intensities required for fracture to occur are known to vary with adsorption.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
dc.titleThe effects ofpH and electrical bias on abrasion of alumina in aqueous solutionsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342651en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26592290en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-27T14:35:50Z
html.description.abstractVarious coolant chemicals are known to have enhancing and suppressing effects on wear and the quality of finish, but little has been understood about the nature of these effects. Studies were performed to examine the effects of pH and surface bias on wear, subsurface damage, and the various theories of chemical interaction with the wear process. Results of this examination of wear suggest that chemical adsorbates can play a significant role in wear fracturing. Previous observations of plastic mechanisms in brittle wear have lead tribologists to suggest that chemically induced changes in plasticity are the cause of these effects. Instead, this thesis contends occurrence of plastic effects to be by-product of localized hydrostatic compression and insufficient stress intensity to cause fracture. Crack rates and stress intensities required for fracture to occur are known to vary with adsorption.


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