Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMaher, Mary Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZambon-Palmer, Angela, 1947-en_US
dc.creatorZambon-Palmer, Angela, 1947-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:26:06Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:26:06Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278477
dc.description.abstractFor three centuries, Shakespeare's Cressida was universally considered to be a fully culpable "daughter of the game." However, as a result of changing cultural conditions at the beginning of the twentieth century, her motivations within the play began to be re-examined. The threat of war in Europe and the women's struggle for equal rights renewed interest in Troilus and Cressida. From this time forward, the play was in constant production. Cressida was regarded as a coquette and a courtesan by critics and directors until the 1960s when Joseph Papp (at the New York Shakespeare Festival) portrayed her as a victim of men and war. In the 1970s, feminist critics in particular studied the nuances of one of Shakespeare's most maligned women. Their observations proved an insightful, three-dimensional analysis of a young woman in a war-torn country. Regardless of the perception of Cressida's motivations by modern thinkers, their considerations of her character were ignored in productions of the 1970s and 1980s.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, English.en_US
dc.titleCharacter conceptions of Shakespeare's Cressida in major twentieth-century productionsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1362204en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33294537en_US
html.description.abstractFor three centuries, Shakespeare's Cressida was universally considered to be a fully culpable "daughter of the game." However, as a result of changing cultural conditions at the beginning of the twentieth century, her motivations within the play began to be re-examined. The threat of war in Europe and the women's struggle for equal rights renewed interest in Troilus and Cressida. From this time forward, the play was in constant production. Cressida was regarded as a coquette and a courtesan by critics and directors until the 1960s when Joseph Papp (at the New York Shakespeare Festival) portrayed her as a victim of men and war. In the 1970s, feminist critics in particular studied the nuances of one of Shakespeare's most maligned women. Their observations proved an insightful, three-dimensional analysis of a young woman in a war-torn country. Regardless of the perception of Cressida's motivations by modern thinkers, their considerations of her character were ignored in productions of the 1970s and 1980s.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_1362204_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
3.431Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record