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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Lauri Macmillanen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuffman, Debra Kay, 1952-
dc.creatorHuffman, Debra Kay, 1952-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:30:38Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:30:38Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278604
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that women perceive, use, and experience space differently than men, in part, because of gender issues and fear of victimization for violent crimes. Recent research has focused on the built environment, violence against women, and the social context of a university. The research study described here investigated women's perception of and actual safety from assault and rape on The University of Arizona campus. Sites perceived as safe and unsafe were identified from responses of 100 women students and administrators. Police reports of 132 campus assaults of women were used to identify sites of past rapes and assaults. Two outdoor sites were assessed in a preliminary study of two environmental audit methods. Findings from this study indicated that respondents perceived the campus as being very safe during the day but unsafe at night. Sites of previous assaults on women overlapped little with the areas women associated with fear.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
dc.titleFear in the landscape: Characteristics of the designed environment as they relate to the perceived and actual safety of women from assault and rapeen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1385744en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37467657en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-04T05:21:17Z
html.description.abstractResearch has shown that women perceive, use, and experience space differently than men, in part, because of gender issues and fear of victimization for violent crimes. Recent research has focused on the built environment, violence against women, and the social context of a university. The research study described here investigated women's perception of and actual safety from assault and rape on The University of Arizona campus. Sites perceived as safe and unsafe were identified from responses of 100 women students and administrators. Police reports of 132 campus assaults of women were used to identify sites of past rapes and assaults. Two outdoor sites were assessed in a preliminary study of two environmental audit methods. Findings from this study indicated that respondents perceived the campus as being very safe during the day but unsafe at night. Sites of previous assaults on women overlapped little with the areas women associated with fear.


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