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dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Christopher Stephen, 1972-*
dc.creatorFitzgerald, Christopher Stephen, 1972-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:31:54Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:31:54Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278643
dc.description.abstractI compared vegetation features and rodent communities between manipulated and non-manipulated ranges in southeastern Arizona during summers 1996 and 1997. I also examined the effect of burying traps to determine if this procedure altered trap sensitivity. I used two-way analysis of variance or paired t-tests for all comparisons and identified relationships between rodents and vegetation features with linear regression. There was no difference (P ) in rodent species richness or population size between mechanically treated and reference areas. Rodent species richness and population size were greater on ungrazed compared to grazed areas (P ), but there was no difference in rodent diversity (P = 0.13). Prescribed fire did not have an obvious impact on rodent species richness or population size, though there seemed to be an increase in kangaroo rats following the burn. Buried traps may have demonstrated a reduction in sensitivity because I caught fewer animals in those traps compared to non-buried traps (P = 0.087).
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Range Management.en_US
dc.titlePotential impacts of rangeland manipulations on desert rodent communitiesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1387968en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWildlife and Fisheries Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38268802en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-27T15:12:18Z
html.description.abstractI compared vegetation features and rodent communities between manipulated and non-manipulated ranges in southeastern Arizona during summers 1996 and 1997. I also examined the effect of burying traps to determine if this procedure altered trap sensitivity. I used two-way analysis of variance or paired t-tests for all comparisons and identified relationships between rodents and vegetation features with linear regression. There was no difference (P ) in rodent species richness or population size between mechanically treated and reference areas. Rodent species richness and population size were greater on ungrazed compared to grazed areas (P ), but there was no difference in rodent diversity (P = 0.13). Prescribed fire did not have an obvious impact on rodent species richness or population size, though there seemed to be an increase in kangaroo rats following the burn. Buried traps may have demonstrated a reduction in sensitivity because I caught fewer animals in those traps compared to non-buried traps (P = 0.087).


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