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dc.contributor.advisorGabriel, J. Philipen_US
dc.contributor.authorHughey, David Jonathan, 1969-
dc.creatorHughey, David Jonathan, 1969-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:32:24Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:32:24Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278659
dc.description.abstractJapan has borrowed much from its continental neighbor, China: a writing system, ideas of government, religion and aspects of culture. The importation of Chinese exemplars and the strong sense of cultural indebtedness have been balanced by a belief in the modern period that China was somehow inferior, or had lost its claim to civilizational greatness. Japan's contradictory view of China continues to this day. In the post-war era, writers such as Inoue Yasushi, Takeda Taijun and Murakami Haruki have written about the legacy of World War Two and Japan's lingering guilt and concomitant revisionism. I intend to demonstrate, via an examination of these authors, how World War Two, specifically Japan's war-time activities in China and Manchuria, and its aftermath are portrayed in fiction.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Asian.en_US
dc.titleConfronting Japan's war in China in modern Japanese literature: Takeda Taijun, Murakami Haruki and Inoue Yasushien_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1389594en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38646845en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-20T03:11:12Z
html.description.abstractJapan has borrowed much from its continental neighbor, China: a writing system, ideas of government, religion and aspects of culture. The importation of Chinese exemplars and the strong sense of cultural indebtedness have been balanced by a belief in the modern period that China was somehow inferior, or had lost its claim to civilizational greatness. Japan's contradictory view of China continues to this day. In the post-war era, writers such as Inoue Yasushi, Takeda Taijun and Murakami Haruki have written about the legacy of World War Two and Japan's lingering guilt and concomitant revisionism. I intend to demonstrate, via an examination of these authors, how World War Two, specifically Japan's war-time activities in China and Manchuria, and its aftermath are portrayed in fiction.


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