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dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert A., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKensler, Meghan Claire*
dc.creatorKensler, Meghan Claireen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:33:20Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:33:20Z
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278688
dc.description.abstractThe General Allotment Act of 1887 was a two-pronged policy aimed at assimilating American Indians into the dominant Euro-American society by allotting individual plots of land to Indians, thereby creating surplus lands which would then be opened up for non-Indian settlement. The process of allotment officially ended in 1934 with the passage of the Indian Reorganization Act, however, it was used again in the late-1900s to gain an individual trust allotment. Ann-Marie Sayers, a Mutsun Band Costanoan Indian, used the General Allotment Act of 1887 to gain her allotment in 1988. Ms. Sayers appropriated this assimilationist act to promote cultural survival. That is, the General Allotment Act was used to obtain an individual trust allotment, but assimilation was not the outcome. Rather in this case, the outcome was the maintenance and promotion of cultural survival.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.titleContemporary Indian allotment: Appropriating an assimilationist policyen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1395264en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39648461en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T23:33:03Z
html.description.abstractThe General Allotment Act of 1887 was a two-pronged policy aimed at assimilating American Indians into the dominant Euro-American society by allotting individual plots of land to Indians, thereby creating surplus lands which would then be opened up for non-Indian settlement. The process of allotment officially ended in 1934 with the passage of the Indian Reorganization Act, however, it was used again in the late-1900s to gain an individual trust allotment. Ann-Marie Sayers, a Mutsun Band Costanoan Indian, used the General Allotment Act of 1887 to gain her allotment in 1988. Ms. Sayers appropriated this assimilationist act to promote cultural survival. That is, the General Allotment Act was used to obtain an individual trust allotment, but assimilation was not the outcome. Rather in this case, the outcome was the maintenance and promotion of cultural survival.


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