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dc.contributor.advisorDeStefano, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuerr, Adam Edwarden_US
dc.creatorDuerr, Adam Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:33:46Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:33:46Z
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278698
dc.description.abstractWaterbirds have died of lead poisoning from ingesting lead sinkers in the United States and Europe. Other tackle and litter has also caused injury and mortality to waterbirds. Despite risks posed to waterbirds, no studies of the abundance of tackle or litter in freshwater systems of the United States have been completed. We tested the effectiveness of a metal detector to search for lost and discarded tackle, and developed a technique to correct densities of sinkers. We then quantified tackle and litter abundance at various sites around the United States. Tackle and litter densities varied among sites, but were generally highest in heavily fished areas. Based on the distribution of tackle in light of known mortalities caused by ingestion of sinkers, restrictive management of lead poisoning from sinkers may not be justified. However, lead is a toxic substance and its continued use when nontoxic alternative are available is not logical.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture.en_US
dc.subjectRecreation.en_US
dc.titleAbundance of lost and discarded fishing tackle and implications for waterbird populations in the United Statesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1396508en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable natural resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.description.notep. 54 is missing from paper original and microfilm version.
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39904799en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T18:17:02Z
html.description.abstractWaterbirds have died of lead poisoning from ingesting lead sinkers in the United States and Europe. Other tackle and litter has also caused injury and mortality to waterbirds. Despite risks posed to waterbirds, no studies of the abundance of tackle or litter in freshwater systems of the United States have been completed. We tested the effectiveness of a metal detector to search for lost and discarded tackle, and developed a technique to correct densities of sinkers. We then quantified tackle and litter abundance at various sites around the United States. Tackle and litter densities varied among sites, but were generally highest in heavily fished areas. Based on the distribution of tackle in light of known mortalities caused by ingestion of sinkers, restrictive management of lead poisoning from sinkers may not be justified. However, lead is a toxic substance and its continued use when nontoxic alternative are available is not logical.


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