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dc.contributor.advisorSchacter, Daniel L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDelaney, Suzanne Marie, 1961-
dc.creatorDelaney, Suzanne Marie, 1961-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:33:56Zen
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:33:56Zen
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278704en
dc.description.abstractImplicit and explicit memory for novel, three-dimensional possible and impossible objects was investigated using two memory tasks. The object decision task required subjects to determine whether line drawings depicted possible or impossible objects. Subjects who studied the global, three-dimensional properties of the possible objects showed superior performance for those items on a subsequent object decision test, while subjects who studied the local features of these same objects showed no improvement. The impossible figures showed no facilitation due to prior exposure. Recognition performance was unaffected by the type of encoding task. These results provided support for the hypothesis that processes mediating priming in the object decision task require access to a specific structural description formed in the initial viewing.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental.en_US
dc.titleImplicit and explicit memory for novel three-dimensional possible and impossible objectsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341466en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26362855en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-17T21:01:18Z
html.description.abstractImplicit and explicit memory for novel, three-dimensional possible and impossible objects was investigated using two memory tasks. The object decision task required subjects to determine whether line drawings depicted possible or impossible objects. Subjects who studied the global, three-dimensional properties of the possible objects showed superior performance for those items on a subsequent object decision test, while subjects who studied the local features of these same objects showed no improvement. The impossible figures showed no facilitation due to prior exposure. Recognition performance was unaffected by the type of encoding task. These results provided support for the hypothesis that processes mediating priming in the object decision task require access to a specific structural description formed in the initial viewing.


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