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dc.contributor.advisorTaren, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrankenfeld, Cara Leaen_US
dc.creatorFrankenfeld, Cara Leaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:34:43Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:34:43Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278730
dc.description.abstractAlmost 600,000 infants acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from their mothers each year, with the majority of these infants living in developing countries. Knowledge regarding the impact of maternal and infant (HIV) infections upon birthweight is controversial. Little is known regarding the presence of HIV infection upon concurrent growth in developing countries. Data from a cohort of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women and their infants in Kisumu, Kenya was analyzed to assess maternal and infant HIV status with birthweight, growth and mortality of the infants. Three hundred and seventy-nine infants were assessed for health at four week intervals for the first year of life. The results of the analyses suggest that although differences in birthweight by (HIV) status alone are not present, HIV-infected infants subsequently gain less weight in the first year of life. Lower weight gain and positive HIV-status were independent predictors of mortality.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Human Development.en_US
dc.titleHuman immunodeficiency virus and weight outcomes of infants in Kisumu, Kenyaen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1399736en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4064053xen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T10:51:45Z
html.description.abstractAlmost 600,000 infants acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection from their mothers each year, with the majority of these infants living in developing countries. Knowledge regarding the impact of maternal and infant (HIV) infections upon birthweight is controversial. Little is known regarding the presence of HIV infection upon concurrent growth in developing countries. Data from a cohort of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women and their infants in Kisumu, Kenya was analyzed to assess maternal and infant HIV status with birthweight, growth and mortality of the infants. Three hundred and seventy-nine infants were assessed for health at four week intervals for the first year of life. The results of the analyses suggest that although differences in birthweight by (HIV) status alone are not present, HIV-infected infants subsequently gain less weight in the first year of life. Lower weight gain and positive HIV-status were independent predictors of mortality.


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