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dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Sarah J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Kristin Nicoleen_US
dc.creatorCooley, Kristin Nicoleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T13:36:18Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T13:36:18Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/278775
dc.description.abstractUniversal expositions of the later nineteenth century were opportunities for the host country to reinforce its sense of nationalism and to showcase its technological progress or, read differently, the progress of man. This thesis examines nationhood as defined in terms of masculinity at the 1889 Paris Universal Exposition, which demonstrated French technological, colonial, and artistic superiority over all other nations. This superiority was trumpeted not just through architecture and colonial exhibits, but also through criticism of other countries' artwork, particularly painting and sculpture from the United States. Also discussed is the reaction of American artists to the criticism received in 1889 by producing art at the 1900 Paris Universal Exposition that resonated with masculinity, thereby projecting an enhanced national identity in fine art.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleThe 1889 and 1900 Paris Universal Expositions: French masculine nationalism and the American responseen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1407001en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArt History Programen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42288629en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T21:49:52Z
html.description.abstractUniversal expositions of the later nineteenth century were opportunities for the host country to reinforce its sense of nationalism and to showcase its technological progress or, read differently, the progress of man. This thesis examines nationhood as defined in terms of masculinity at the 1889 Paris Universal Exposition, which demonstrated French technological, colonial, and artistic superiority over all other nations. This superiority was trumpeted not just through architecture and colonial exhibits, but also through criticism of other countries' artwork, particularly painting and sculpture from the United States. Also discussed is the reaction of American artists to the criticism received in 1889 by producing art at the 1900 Paris Universal Exposition that resonated with masculinity, thereby projecting an enhanced national identity in fine art.


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