• Dysphagia in Encephalopathic Neonates Treated with Hypothermia

      Collins, Michael; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Miller, Jeffrey (The University of Arizona., 2013-03)
      Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of dysphagia in neonates treated with targeted body temperature reduction as compared to neonates who have not been exposed to hypothermia. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of encephalopathic neonates who were treated with hypothermia and who underwent a modified barium swallow (MBS). For comparison, a group of neonates who had been evaluated with MBS but did not receive hypothermic therapy was identified. This group consisted of non-encephalopathic patients. MBS results were qualified as either normal or abnormal. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of abnormal MBS results between the hypothermic and control groups (Fisher’s exact; P = 0.78). The odds ratio for abnormal MBS results in the hypothermia group relative to the control group was 1.2, with 95% confidence interval of 0.42 to 3.8. Significance: These data indicate that hypothermia does not seem to increase short term risk of dysphagia compared to the control group. There is no apparent association between hypothermia and dysphagia. This supports previous findings that hypothermia is a safe treatment for neural injuries in NICU patients.